Seychelles : Photos

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Clouds on fire

Nox947 posted a photo:

Clouds on fire




Weird evening...

Seychelles-Mahe island




Cousine IsIand, Seychelles

Valentina Underwater posted a photo:

Cousine IsIand, Seychelles




Emanuel...

John Konstandis posted a photo:

Emanuel...




Max thinking with Grandma

Michael Croft posted a photo:

Max thinking with Grandma




Exploring Victoria...(5)

Seychelles-Mahe island




Exploring Victoria...(6)

Seychelles-Mahe island




Sunrising at Anse Volbert, Côte d'Or, Praslin - #explored 2018/09/10

Sonnenaufgang am Anse Volbert der Côte d'Or auf der Insel Praslin der Seychellen.

Sunrising at Anse Volbert, Côte d'Or, Praslin, Seychelles.

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AIR FINLAND OH-AFK B757-28A arrival at "Durham Tees Valley Airport" MME England

Boeing 757-28A
First flight date 24/02/1993

10/03/1993 Air Seychelles S7-AAX
05/12/1996 Air Transat C-GTSV
11/06/2002 Air Holland PH-AHS
15/05/2003 Air Scotland PH-AHS
17/12/2003 Air Holland PH-AHS Ceased operations 03/2004 -
28/04/2004 Air Finland OH-AFK
13/08/2007 Atlas Jet OH-AFK
29/09/2007 Air Finland OH-AFK Stored 03/2011
15/03/2012 TNT Airways OO-TFA
01/08/2016 ASL Airlines Belgium OO-TFA




La digue, Seychelles

Valentina Underwater posted a photo:

La digue, Seychelles




La digue, SeycheIIes

Valentina Underwater posted a photo:

La digue, SeycheIIes




Exploring Victoria...(3)

Seychelles-Mahe island




Exploring Victoria...(4)

Seychelles-Mahe island




Exploring Victoria...(1)

Seychelles-Mahe island




Exploring Victoria...(2)

Seychelles-Mahe island




Seychelles Kestrel

The Seychelles kestrel (Falco araeus) is a small bird of prey belonging to the genus Falco in the falcon family, Falconidae. It is endemic to the Seychelles Islands where it is the only breeding bird of prey. It is known in Seychellois Creole as the katiti after its loud, shrill call.

Description

It is the smallest of the kestrels, 18–23 cm long with a wingspan of 40–45 cm. The wings are fairly short and rounded. The adult male's upperparts are reddish brown with black spots while the underparts are unspotted and buff. The head and rump are dark blue-grey. The tail is blue-grey with black bars. The bill is dark and the feet and cere are yellow. Females are similar to the males in appearance but are a little larger and paler. Immature birds have a brown, streaked head, spots on the breast and a buff tip to the tail.

Ecology

It can be seen in forest, scrub and farmland and around rock faces and houses. It rarely hovers, instead feeding by sitting on an exposed perch and waiting for prey to pass, then swooping down to catch it. Lizards, particularly green day geckos (Phelsuma) and skinks (Mabuya), make up 92% of its diet and it will also take small birds, frogs, rats and insects.

The breeding territory covers just 40 hectares, the smallest of any bird of prey. Breeding occurs from August to October. The nest site is on a cliff, tree or building. It is a simple scrape with no nest material used. Two or three eggs are laid; they are white with brown markings and are incubated for 28–31 days. The young birds fledge after 35–42 days and then remain with their parents for another 14 weeks.

Conservation

The species has a population of about 800 birds and is classified as vulnerable. Lowland nests have a high failure rate of about 70-80%. It probably bred throughout the granitic central Seychelles in the past but is currently known to breed only on Mahé, Silhouette, North Island, Praslin and some small adjacent islands. It was reintroduced to Praslin in 1977.

Threats are thought to include habitat loss due to logging, housing development and fires as well as predation and competition by introduced species. Rats, cats and barn owls have reduced the lizard population on which the kestrels depend and they may take eggs and chicks. Barn owls and common mynas have occupied many suitable nest sites.

Persecution by humans is now rare. In the past, kestrels were killed because they were thought to take chickens and because they were considered to be an omen of death.




Seychelles......

Mahe......




White Tern feeding young

The white tern (Gygis alba) is a small seabird found across the tropical oceans of the world. It is sometimes known as the fairy tern although this name is potentially confusing as it is the common name of the fairy tern (Sternula nereis). Other names for the species include angel tern and white noddy.

Taxonomy

The white tern was first formally described by the Swedish naturalist Anders Sparrman in 1786 under the binomial name Sterna alba.[2] The genus Gygis was introduced by the German zoologist Johann Georg Wagler in 1832.[3] The name Gygis is from the Ancient Greek guges for a mythical bird and the specific alba is Latin for "white".[4]

Molecular phylogenetic studies have shown that the white tern is more closely related to the noddies than it is to the other terns.[5] This implies that "white noddy" would be a more appropriate English name.[6]

The white tern has the following subspecies:[6]
G. a. alba, (Sparrman, 1786): tropical islands of the south Atlantic
G. a. candida, (Gmelin, 1789): Seychelles & Mascarene Islands to central Pacific including southern Maldives excluding ranges of next two subspecies
G. a. microrhyncha, Saunders, 1876: Phoenix, Line and Marquesas Islands
G. a. leucopes, Holyoak & Thibault, 1976: Pitcairn Islands

The subspecies G. a. microrhyncha, the little white tern, is sometimes considered as a separate species, Gygis microrhyncha.[7]

Description

Related to the noddies, the white tern is small with a wingspan of 76–87 cm (30–34 in).[8] It has white plumage and a long black bill.[9] Nesting on coral islands, usually on trees with small branches but also on rocky ledges and on man-made structures, the white tern feeds on small fish which it catches by plunge diving.

Distribution and habitat

The white tern ranges widely across the Pacific Ocean from the coasts of Chile and Colombia to New Zealand and along the eastern and southern coasts of Asia from China to India, the islands of the Indian Ocean, and the coast of South Africa.[10] Rarely it is also found in Japan, Madagascar, Mexico, and on some islands in the Atlantic Ocean. It is a pelagic and epipelagic bird, living along the coast and moving into wooded areas during the breeding season.

Behavior

This species is notable for laying its egg on bare thin branches in a small fork or depression without a nest. This behaviour is unusual for terns, which generally nest on the ground, and even the related tree-nesting black noddy constructs a nest. It is thought that the reason for the absence of nests is the reduction in nest parasites, which in some colonial seabirds can cause the abandonment of an entire colony.[11] In spite of these benefits there are costs associated with tree nesting, as the eggs and chicks are vulnerable to becoming dislodged by heavy winds. For this reason the white tern is also quick to relay should it lose the egg. The newly hatched chicks have well developed feet with which to hang on to their precarious nesting site. It is a long-lived bird, having been recorded living for 42[12] years.




Seychelles Fody

The Seychelles fody (Foudia sechellarum) is a small yellowish songbird that are native to the Seychelles islands of Cousin Island, Cousine Island, Frégate Island, and have been introduced to Aride Island, D'Arros Island and as of 2004 Denis Island. Their natural habitat is woodland, but they have adapted to living in such habitats as coconut plantations and gardens.[1]
Description[edit]

The male Seychelles fody has a yellow face in breeding plumage which the female lacks. The plumage is in general a drab olive and the beak is black. This bird grows to a length of about 12.5 cm (5 in). The female and juvenile resembles the female and juvenile red fody (Foudia madagascariensis), but can be distinguished by having upper parts with less streaking.[1]

Ecology

The Seychelles fody feeds mainly on insects and other small arthropods, as well as eating fruit, nectar and seeds. It has been known to feed on the eggs of seabirds. The diet includes bugs, beetles, ants and spiders. On Cousin, this bird has a clearly defined breeding season, between May and September, after which period it moults. On some other islands it seems to breed throughout the year.[2] It shares the same habitat in the Seychelles with a related introduced species, the red fody.[1]

Status

The International Union for Conservation of Nature has recently changed the status of the bird from "endangered" to "near threatened" due to successful conservation efforts by Nature Seychelles.[1] Presently it is estimated that there are approximately 3500 Seychelles fodies. Introductions, by relocating birds to predator-free islands, have helped the birds to increase their numbers and newly-introduced birds to the island of Aride managed three breeding attempts in the first thirteen months they were there.[1]




Exploring La Digue Island...(1)

Seychelles - La Digue Island





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