Tanzania : Photos

Discover every day Photographs of the various countries of Africa and the Caribbean

All the photos are from the photo sharing website flickr

Use the left menu to choose a country.




Crocodylus niloticus (Nile Crocodile)

Serengeti National Park, Tanzania
May 2018




Hippo pool

Serengeti National Park, Tanzania
May 2018




Hippo pool

Serengeti National Park, Tanzania
May 2018




Pied Wagtail

Serengeti National Park, Tanzania
May 2018




Heavy Footed

PhilHydePhotos posted a photo:

Heavy Footed




Spurfowl Red-necked

michael heyns posted a photo:

Spurfowl Red-necked




Spurfowl Red-necked

michael heyns posted a photo:

Spurfowl Red-necked




Spurfowl Red-necked

michael heyns posted a photo:

Spurfowl Red-necked




Falcon Pygmy Male

The pygmy falcon, or African pygmy falcon (Polihierax semitorquatus), is a falcon that lives in eastern and southern Africa and is the smallest raptor on the continent. As a small falcon, only 19 to 20 cm long, it preys on insects, small reptiles, and small mammals.

Adult pygmy falcons are white below and on the face, grey above, and females having a chestnut back. There are white "eye spots" on the nape. Juveniles have a brown back, duller than adult females, with a rufous wash on the breast. The flight feathers of the wings are spotted black and white (more black above, more white below); the tail is barred black and white.

The flight is low and undulating. In size, pattern, and the habit of perching upright on an exposed branch or treetop, this species resembles some shrikes.

The call is "a high-pitched kikiKIK, repeated" (Kenya) or "a 'chip-chip' and a 'kik-kik-kik-kik'" (southern Africa).

n Kenya, pygmy falcons nest in white-headed buffalo weaver nests, and the ranges of the two birds coincide. In southern Africa, they are found around red-billed buffalo weaver nests but predominantly nest in the vacant rooms of sociable weaver nests,[3] which are large and multichambered—even if the sociable weavers still have an active colony in the nest. Despite being bird-eaters and bigger than sociable weavers, the pygmy falcons largely leave the latter alone, though they do occasionally catch and eat nestlings and even adults.

Pygmy falcons provided one of the rare documented cases of intraspecific killing to acquire a new mate and territory.

Pygmy falcon territories are occasionally inhabited by groups, where there are more than two adults living together and tending nestlings. There are four potential reasons for this behaviour: defence, co-operative polyandry, delayed dispersal of offspring and cooperation, and thermoregulation (warmth). Corroboration for the last is that in winter African pygmy falcons nest further inside the nest of sociable weavers, where there is better insulation.

Wikipedia




Falcon Pygmy Female

michael heyns posted a photo:

Falcon Pygmy Female




Falcon Pygmy Couple

michael heyns posted a photo:

Falcon Pygmy Couple




Lion dragging Buffalo Kill

Serengeti National Park, Tanzania
May 2018




Dinner

A delicious dinner at Zanzest Beach Bungalows

Jambiani, Zanzibar, Tanzania




Mrs Dragonspeed

Enjoying the tropical weather, next to the ocean at Zanzest Beach Bungalows

Jambiani, Zanzibar, Tanzania




Catch of the day

The catch of the day at Zanzest Beach Bungalows

Jambiani, Zanzibar, Tanzania




Hanging out with 100 year olds

We visited the Giant Aldabra Tortoises of Changu Island. Some are over 100 years old. Despite the rumour, tortoises can move pretty fast when you have food. Watch out for that sharp beak!

Changuu Island, Zanzibar, Tanzania




Hanging out with 100 year olds

We visited the Giant Aldabra Tortoises of Changu Island. Some are over 100 years old. Despite the rumour, tortoises can move pretty fast when you have food. Watch out for that sharp beak!

Changuu Island, Zanzibar, Tanzania




Romantic pathway

The lanterns are lit and laid out along the pathway to the bungalows in the evening, at Zanzest Beach Bungalows

Jambiani, Zanzibar, Tanzania




Peacock - staying cool

A beautiful peacock greeted us, just outside of the tortoise enclosure, on Changuu island.

Changuu Island, Zanzibar, Tanzania




Hanging out with 100 year olds

We visited the Giant Aldabra Tortoises of Changu Island. Some are over 100 years old. Despite the rumour, tortoises can move pretty fast when you have food. Watch out for that sharp beak!

Changuu Island, Zanzibar, Tanzania





Images automaticaly loaded from flickr with tags : (tanzanie,tanzania)