Antilhas Francesas : Photos

Descubram cada dias das Fotografias dos diferentes países da África e as Antilhas

Todas as imagens provêm do serviço de divisão de fotografia flickr

Utilizem a ementa de esquerda para escolher um país.




Angry bananaquit

The bananaquit (Coereba flaveola) sitting on the aloe vera flower isn't actually angry. They just seem that way when you look at them straight on.

In papiamento (the creole of Aruba, Curacao and Bonaire), they have many names, including "chibichibi" (which is how their melodious call sounds), "chichubi", and "bachi pretu".

The are nectarivores (feed primarily on nectar) and this one had just taken its fill from the aloe plant. They tussle over the sweetest plants, which can make for fun listening to their "chi - chi - chi - chi - chi" as they try to send competitors away.

Unlike hummingbirds, they cannot hover. They always perch on the flowers and use their scimitar shaped beak to reach for the nectar. Also unlike hummers, they love feeders with sugar water.




Diamant village, Martinique

Olivier Rainaud posted a photo:

Diamant village, Martinique




Port-Louis, Guadeloupe : facing Montserrat island

Olivier Rainaud posted a photo:

Port-Louis, Guadeloupe : facing Montserrat island




Trumpetfish

A trumpetfish (Aulostomus maculatus) hiding among rope sponges under Salt Pier.

They can change colors. This reddish-brown is most common, but occasionally they are entirely yellow.

They are voracious hunters, sucking their prey into their mouth using a quick expansion motion that creates a vacuum.

They are in the same family as seahorses and cornetfish.

Trumpetfish, to rest or to hunt, often hover vertically among long "string like" sponges or corals, such as sea rods or gorgonians.

To get this shot required me to "become a trumpetfish" - head down, fins up, so that I could get my camera rig very low, looking nearly straight up. Not obvious, but because of the fisheye lens, my dome is only inches away from the fish.

We have mixed feeling about Salt Pier. It is used commercially to transport sea salt up north to used on roadways. It is not a natural structure on the reef. But it teems with fishes, corals and sponges. Unfortunately, because of that, it can also be chock full of divers, many of whom are too novice with diving to avoid crashing into the encrusted sponges on the pillars. So we try to go early in the morning or late in the day.

This image is taken probably at about 12m (40ft) in depth.




Sunset sur la Pointe de la Vigie

TravelerRauni posted a photo:

Sunset sur la Pointe de la Vigie




Caribbean beach of "Anse à la Gourde", Guadeloupe

Olivier Rainaud posted a photo:

Caribbean beach of "Anse à la Gourde", Guadeloupe




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TravelerRauni posted a photo:

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TravelerRauni posted a photo:

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Paruline

TravelerRauni posted a photo:

Paruline




Beautiful sunset at the beach in Martinique, French Caribbean

Olivier Rainaud posted a photo:

Beautiful sunset at the beach in Martinique, French Caribbean




(CDG) CORSAIR International Airbus A330-300 F-HSKY Landing runway 08R

Paris CDG Juin 2020




(ORY)Air Caraïbes Airbus A350-900 F-HNET Takeoff runway 24

Paris Orly Après 3 mois de fermeture réouverture ce vendredi 26 Juin 2020 avec ce départ pour Fort de France.




Chutes du Carbet, Basse-Terre, Guadeloupe

Chutes du Carbet, Basse-Terre, Guadeloupe

Les chutes du Carbet sont trois chutes d’eau situées dans le Parc national de la Guadeloupe, dans la forêt humide au pied du volcan de la Soufrière.

Christophe Colomb a décrit les chutes dans son carnet de bord en 1493 comme "une très grande source qui répandait l’eau de tous côtés de la montagne".

(6 janvier 2019)
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Slave huts on Bonaire

Buy this photo on Getty Images : Getty Images

Bonaire Slave Huts
Before it was a scuba destination, Bonaire's main industry was the production of sea salt. In the days of slavery, men and women were forced to work as saltrakers in the salt evaporation pans of Bonaire's south sho