Botswana : Photos

Descubram cada dias das Fotografias dos diferentes países da África e as Antilhas

Todas as imagens provêm do serviço de divisão de fotografia flickr

Utilizem a ementa de esquerda para escolher um país.




Playtime

Another shot from Nxai Pan, Botswana. This was our first sight as we entered the camp - hard to beat, eh?

"Nxai Pan National Park is a national park in north-eastern Botswana, consisting of Nxai Pan, which is one of the Makgadikgadi Pan salt flats. Nxai Pan National Park lies just north of the Maun-Nata main road and adjoins Makgadikgadi Pans National Park on its northern border. The pan itself is a fossil lake bed about 40 square km in size."




Low-level flight

over the Chobe river.
African Fish Eagle in Botswana.

follow me on instagram:
www.instagram.com/thomas63retterath/

All rights reserved. Thomas Retterath 2018




White-winged Tern (Chlidonias leucopterus)

Ian N. White posted a photo:

White-winged Tern  (Chlidonias leucopterus)




Black-crowned Tchagra (5118)

The Black-crowned Tchagra is a member of the bushshrike family, and we found this one lingering in the shrubs near the Khwai tented camps in Botswana. I thought his was an especially attractive bird, with its chestnut-colored wings and finely barred tail.




Black-shouldered Kite (3525)

The Black-shouldered Kite is also referred to as the Black-winged Kite, and in this photo it takes on a pinkish appearance because it's late in the day, and the setting sun casts a warm light on the bird. We saw this one in the same location two days in a row, so I am guessing it is a favorite perch for this individual.




Blue Waxbill (5838)

The Blue Waxbill is also referred to as the Blue-cheeked Cordon-bleu, but in Southern Africa, they are called Waxbills. The Avibase website refers to them as the Blue-breasted Cordonbleu, whereas Clements and eBird call them the Southern Cordonbleu. You can have almost any name you want. They forage on the ground in flocks, and have a very attractive pale blue coloration to their undersides.




Black Crake (5017)

Black Crakes are very shy birds, and though we saw them at least twice, usually near the water's edge, but walking in and out of the grass, this one gave us a nice clear view in some marshes near the Khwai tented camps in Botswana.




Burchell's Starling (2377)

We saw several varieties of Starlings in our visit to Southern Africa. One of the largest ones is Burchell's Starling. It superficially resembles the Greater Blue-eared Starling and Meve's Starlings, but is distinguishable by its size, shorter tail, and broad dark facial patch. This one has found himself a worm.

Avibase and eBird refer to these as Burchell's Glossy-Starling, while Clements calls them just a Burchell's Starling.




African Pipit (4407)

There are a lot of birds that are hard to tell apart. This African Pipit is a good example of one, superficially resembling several members of the Lark family and/or the Cisticola family. Size, voice and occasionally distinctive markings help, as does a good guide.




Black-backed Puffback (4575)

The Black-backed Puffback is a member of the bushshrike family, and gets its name from its display behavior, where it puffs out the feathers on its rump to assume a ball-like shape. We saw the dispaly once, but didn't capture it photographically.




African Fish Eagle (5185)

African Fish Eagles were relatively common everywhere we visited in Southern Africa, so long as we were near water of some kind.




Black-winged Stilt (3163)

We saw quite a few Black-winged Stilts at all the camps we visited in southern Africa. The frequent the marshy areas, and are very distinctive in the black and white dress, with very red legs.




African Jacana (9423)

African Jacanas are common along any of the flowing water features we visited. They would patrol the grass banks and shorelines, typically unbothered by any of the other birds present, and not pestering anyone else.




African Openbill (3992)

African Openbills are fairly common storks that would hang out in all the marshy water areas, often in large flocks. We saw a flock of 50 or more all congregate in a single tree at sunset one evening, but our attention to their gathering was unsettling to them, and they flew off to another location.




African Barred Owlet (2436)

On our trip to Africa, we saw only two different kinds of owls, and this African Barred Owlet was our only daytime sighting of an owl (or owlet). This small little fellow was quietly observing us from a tree near the Chobe River near the Linyanti Camp.




Bateleur (5104)

The Bateleur is a pretty common member of the Eagle family. We saw many adults and juveniles, recognizable by their red beaks and short tails.




African Spoonbill (5339)

I believe the African Spoonbill is the only Spoonbill species seen in Southern Africa. We saw them on several occasions, always wading near water in mixed flocks with other shorebirds.




Local made items to sell to Tourists_6469

This display was at the Senyati Camp.




Observation Trail _6491

Victoria Falls
Victoria Falls is a town in western Zimbabwe and a gateway to the massive waterfall of the same name. Here, the Zambezi River plummets over a cliff and into the Boiling Pot before flowing through a series of gorges. The Devil’s Pool, a natural infinity pool, is on the edge of a sheer drop. Spanning the river is 1905 Victoria Falls Bridge.




Tumbling Waters _6485

Victoria Falls
Victoria Falls is a town in western Zimbabwe and a gateway to the massive waterfall of the same name. Here, the Zambezi River plummets over a cliff and into the Boiling Pot before flowing through a series of gorges. The Devil’s Pool, a natural infinity pool, is on the edge of a sheer drop. Spanning the river is 1905 Victoria Falls Bridge.





Imagens automaticamente encarregadas desde flickr com para tags : (botswana)