Republica Centroafricana : Photos

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The COVID-19 crisis in South Sudan - photo by Clara Simon

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Amina
Age: 28
Profession: Hairdresser
Location: Mauna, South Sudan

"I can barely provide for myself anymore. It is very difficult to make a living nowadays, as people won’t come to the salon.

I'm even afraid of them if they do come because I don’t know who they have been in contact with. This is very bad for business.

I am worried about my health, but also income is a great concern. I struggle to make ends meet.

I don’t have any children but I have people I take care of. I have to provide for my parents.

We need food and money. Anything is fine as long as it keeps me alive."




The COVID-19 crisis in South Sudan - photo by Clara Simon

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Reida Gaba
Age: 46
Profession: Vegetable vendor
Location: Juba, South Sudan

"Since the crisis started, I’m not making enough money anymore. I struggle to sell enough in a day to afford other basics like soap, salt and medicines.

My income is my main concern. If there is no income to buy food, my children and I will not survive.

I have seven children. Because of the coronacrisis we only have one meal a day. All we eat is what is leftover from my stand at the end of the day. Jus vegetables.

We need help. It is such a terrible feeling when it is 4 pm and I haven’t sold anything yet and the children are expecting me to buy something like small fish, just to have an addition to the vegetables they have already been eating the whole week. Sometimes it makes me feel like crying.

I just hope things will get back to the way they were before corona."




The COVID-19 crisis in South Sudan - photo by Clara Simon

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: John
Age: 32
Profession: Charcoal vendor
Location: Munuki, South Sudan

"My supply has been affected since the crisis started. This means I don't have enough charcoal to sell and I don't make enough money to meet my needs.

Without an income, you can’t be healthy. That is why I am still here in my shop and still seeing customers every day, although I am not supposed to meet any people.

I even fear for my safety when I'm interacting with customers, but I have to keep my business going.

I have a wife and two children and also some relatives live in our house as well. This affects everyone in my family. They depend on my income. We all eat much less now.

Any kind of support would be very welcome, like food, soap or even money.

I really hope life will return to normal."




The COVID-19 crisis in the Central African Republic - photo by Zigoto Tchaya

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Derrick Mazangue
Age: 20
Profession: Cell phone credit vendor
Location: Bangui, Central African Republic

"COVID-19 has affected me a lot. My business was going just fine. A lot of people would pass-by and buy their phone credit at my stand. This road was always very busy. Now people are supposed to stay at home and I lost many customers. I can't eat well. Everything seems to be happening in slow motion.

My main concern is not even my health. My biggest problem is money. I am not a civil servant. I don't have a monthly salary. I only rely on my business to get by and to help my two little brothers.

On top of that, I can no longer hug my friends and relatives. This coronavirus has turned the world upside down.

Some people wear masks and others don't. I wash my hands too much. I don't visit my friends and I don't have any money anymore.

I don't get any support either since my parents are no longer alive and I am the one who has to take care of my brothers.

It's difficult. With the coronavirus going around, we can't move forward. The future is blurry. It's painful to think like that.

For now, the only thing we can do is to respect the instructions from the government and the world health organization. Social distance, cough in your elbow or in a handkerchief and throw it out. Stay indoors."




The COVID-19 crisis in the Central African Republic - photo by Zigoto Tchaya

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Derrick Mazangue
Age: 20
Profession: Cell phone credit vendor
Location: Bangui, Central African Republic

"COVID-19 has affected me a lot. My business was going just fine. A lot of people would pass-by and buy their phone credit at my stand. This road was always very busy. Now people are supposed to stay at home and I lost many customers. I can't eat well. Everything seems to be happening in slow motion.

My main concern is not even my health. My biggest problem is money. I am not a civil servant. I don't have a monthly salary. I only rely on my business to get by and to help my two little brothers.

On top of that, I can no longer hug my friends and relatives. This coronavirus has turned the world upside down.

Some people wear masks and others don't. I wash my hands too much. I don't visit my friends and I don't have any money anymore.

I don't get any support either since my parents are no longer alive and I am the one who has to take care of my brothers.

It's difficult. With the coronavirus going around, we can't move forward. The future is blurry. It's painful to think like that.

For now, the only thing we can do is to respect the instructions from the government and the world health organization. Social distance, cough in your elbow or in a handkerchief and throw it out. Stay indoors."




The COVID-19 crisis in the Central African Republic - photo by Zigoto Tchaya

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Marie-Rose Mefoungi
Age: 60
Profession: Cook
Location: Bangui, Central African Republic

"This crisis is very serious. I used to be able to sell 50 to 60 fish a day. But, today, I can't anymore. They asked us to stay inside our house. I need to go out to work, but then I risk getting infected.

I'm already struggling with my health, but money is still my greatest concern right now. We already lost a lot during the war. Corona has added even more wounds. It's too much.

Does this disease even really exist? I don't know. I really can’t tell. I don't understand why the number of cases increases every day but people are not dying in this country. Are those figures from the government? Don't you think it's suspicious? I don't get it.

We were living in a house that I had built with my husband, who now suffers from a stroke. We fled the violence in 2013 to take refuge in this neighbourhood. Now I am renting and it is difficult for me, my husband and my 7 children.

I don't have any backup. I'm in a lot of pain. Who will support me? The government could have given us a little support to get us through this period. But nothing. How are we going to get out of this?

Despite all this, I'm still a positive woman. I'm religious and very hopeful that this virus will one day be over. Before it was AIDS and cholera. Now we don't talk about those diseases anymore.

Corona is not the black man's disease. Planes brought it here. It's going to be over one day and our country will be safe again."




The COVID-19 crisis in the Central African Republic - photo by Zigoto Tchaya

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Derrick Mazangue
Age: 20
Profession: Cell phone credit vendor
Location: Bangui, Central African Republic

"COVID-19 has affected me a lot. My business was going just fine. A lot of people would pass-by and buy their phone credit at my stand. This road was always very busy. Now people are supposed to stay at home and I lost many customers. I can't eat well. Everything seems to be happening in slow motion.

My main concern is not even my health. My biggest problem is money. I am not a civil servant. I don't have a monthly salary. I only rely on my business to get by and to help my two little brothers.

On top of that, I can no longer hug my friends and relatives. This coronavirus has turned the world upside down.

Some people wear masks and others don't. I wash my hands too much. I don't visit my friends and I don't have any money anymore.

I don't get any support either since my parents are no longer alive and I am the one who has to take care of my brothers.

It's difficult. With the coronavirus going around, we can't move forward. The future is blurry. It's painful to think like that.

For now, the only thing we can do is to respect the instructions from the government and the world health organization. Social distance, cough in your elbow or in a handkerchief and throw it out. Stay indoors."




The COVID-19 crisis in the Central African Republic - photo by Zigoto Tchaya

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Marie-Rose Mefoungi
Age: 60
Profession: Cook
Location: Bangui, Central African Republic

"This crisis is very serious. I used to be able to sell 50 to 60 fish a day. But, today, I can't anymore. They asked us to stay inside our house. I need to go out to work, but then I risk getting infected.

I'm already struggling with my health, but money is still my greatest concern right now. We already lost a lot during the war. Corona has added even more wounds. It's too much.

Does this disease even really exist? I don't know. I really can’t tell. I don't understand why the number of cases increases every day but people are not dying in this country. Are those figures from the government? Don't you think it's suspicious? I don't get it.

We were living in a house that I had built with my husband, who now suffers from a stroke. We fled the violence in 2013 to take refuge in this neighbourhood. Now I am renting and it is difficult for me, my husband and my 7 children.

I don't have any backup. I'm in a lot of pain. Who will support me? The government could have given us a little support to get us through this period. But nothing. How are we going to get out of this?

Despite all this, I'm still a positive woman. I'm religious and very hopeful that this virus will one day be over. Before it was AIDS and cholera. Now we don't talk about those diseases anymore.

Corona is not the black man's disease. Planes brought it here. It's going to be over one day and our country will be safe again."




What is it like to live in a war-torn country in times of the COVID-19 pandemic?

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.




The COVID-19 crisis in South Sudan - photo by Clara Simon

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.




The COVID-19 crisis in the Central African Republic - photo by Zigoto Tchaya

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Gertrude Nardine Setou
Age: 39
Profession: Fruit and vegetable vendor
Location: Bangui, Central African Republic

"The corona crisis has seriously devastated my life a great deal. I no longer make enough money to look after my children. I used to travel to another town, some 150 kilometres away, to buy and sell tomatoes and carrots. The transport fair has become unaffordable because the government no longer wants drivers to overload their busses with passengers due to the pandemic. Also, the goods I usually buy and sell have become way more expensive.

I am a mother of 5 children. My husband died 7 months ago. It is difficult for me to survive with my children. I also struggle with high blood pressure.

I am suffering alone. Many in my family died during the war in 2013. I have no one to lean on. It is just me and my children.

Money is my biggest concern right now. I am glad none of my children is sick. But, I still need money. Without it, we cannot remain in good health either.

I don’t even know what this coronavirus is all about. I just heard my neighbours talking a lot about it and saying that we shouldn’t be going out of our house because we could get infected and die. We should stay home and wash our hands is all we know. And we need to cough in our elbow or in a handkerchief and throw it out immediately. I honestly do not understand the least thing about it. I am just following the instructions people are giving me. In the last three months, I have been washing my hands with soap a lot more.

I do not think anything is going to improve any time soon, because the coronacrisis is not over. There is also a war going on in some parts of the country. We are suffering.

I heard that it was a white man who brought the virus here. Let him take it back to his country or to a country where there is no war."




The COVID-19 crisis in the Central African Republic - photo by Zigoto Tchaya

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Gertrude Nardine Setou
Age: 39
Profession: Fruit and vegetable vendor
Location: Bangui, Central African Republic

"The corona crisis has seriously devastated my life a great deal. I no longer make enough money to look after my children. I used to travel to another town, some 150 kilometres away, to buy and sell tomatoes and carrots. The transport fair has become unaffordable because the government no longer wants drivers to overload their busses with passengers due to the pandemic. Also, the goods I usually buy and sell have become way more expensive.

I am a mother of 5 children. My husband died 7 months ago. It is difficult for me to survive with my children. I also struggle with high blood pressure.

I am suffering alone. Many in my family died during the war in 2013. I have no one to lean on. It is just me and my children.

Money is my biggest concern right now. I am glad none of my children is sick. But, I still need money. Without it, we cannot remain in good health either.

I don’t even know what this coronavirus is all about. I just heard my neighbours talking a lot about it and saying that we shouldn’t be going out of our house because we could get infected and die. We should stay home and wash our hands is all we know. And we need to cough in our elbow or in a handkerchief and throw it out immediately. I honestly do not understand the least thing about it. I am just following the instructions people are giving me. In the last three months, I have been washing my hands with soap a lot more.

I do not think anything is going to improve any time soon, because the coronacrisis is not over. There is also a war going on in some parts of the country. We are suffering.

I heard that it was a white man who brought the virus here. Let him take it back to his country or to a country where there is no war."




The COVID-19 crisis in the Central African Republic - photo by Zigoto Tchaya

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Roger Mboliss
Age: 67
Profession: Bar owner
Location: Bangui, Central African Republic

"I am the owner and manager of my own bar here in Bangui. The coronavirus has put us in all a socio-economic disorder.

My son went to Congo Kinshasa for a holiday. Three days before his return to Bangui, the borders closed because of the corona pandemic. He can't come back until the ban is lifted.

My son should be here now to continue his school. He is suffering where he is now. I have to send him money because he can't work there. This affects me as well. This is too much suffering for me and my family.

Health comes first. Since the corona pandemic is ravaging the whole world, I have to protect my family. It is a universal health problem. Money comes second. Everyone needs money, but health should come first.

I am married and a father of 9 children. I no longer go out of the house. I stay inside with my children. It is difficult to control the kids during this period. They are very rowdy. The noise is too much.

Before I started selling drinks, I was a truck driver. I used to deliver wood. I had my own truck and thieves stole it during the war that destroyed our country in 2013. After the war, I used all the money had saved to start a bar.

Now I sell about 4 crates a week. Before the crisis, I sold 25 a day. Times have gotten very tough.

I am an old man. I don’t have the energy to do start another business to generate an income. So I really need financial support right now.

This corona thing is the most dangerous health problem that I have heard of in my lifetime. It will only improve if people respect the instructions of the government. Otherwise, the number of infections and many people will die.

It is very simple. Keep a distance of at least one meter from each other. No overcrowding."




The COVID-19 crisis in South Sudan - photo by Clara Simon

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Okumu John
Age: 26
Profession: Carpenter
Location: Gudele, South Sudan

"Since the pandemic, I can't work in my business anymore. I can't buy the materials I need. I can’t work on my marketing activities.

And I can't go out with my friends.

I'm very concerned about my income. Before corona, I was doing fine. Now I'm struggling.

I don’t have any children. I live with my brothers, we all work in the carpentry workshop. My parents live in Torit and I provide for them. I send them money and food. Now I can't because there is no money anymore.

I wish this was over soon, so I can travel to see my parents and generate an income again."




The COVID-19 crisis in the Central African Republic - photo by Zigoto Tchaya

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Marie-Rose Mefoungi
Age: 60
Profession: Cook
Location: Bangui, Central African Republic

"This crisis is very serious. I used to be able to sell 50 to 60 fish a day. But, today, I can't anymore. They asked us to stay inside our house. I need to go out to work, but then I risk getting infected.

I'm already struggling with my health, but money is still my greatest concern right now. We already lost a lot during the war. Corona has added even more wounds. It's too much.

Does this disease even really exist? I don't know. I really can’t tell. I don't understand why the number of cases increases every day but people are not dying in this country. Are those figures from the government? Don't you think it's suspicious? I don't get it.

We were living in a house that I had built with my husband, who now suffers from a stroke. We fled the violence in 2013 to take refuge in this neighbourhood. Now I am renting and it is difficult for me, my husband and my 7 children.

I don't have any backup. I'm in a lot of pain. Who will support me? The government could have given us a little support to get us through this period. But nothing. How are we going to get out of this?

Despite all this, I'm still a positive woman. I'm religious and very hopeful that this virus will one day be over. Before it was AIDS and cholera. Now we don't talk about those diseases anymore.

Corona is not the black man's disease. Planes brought it here. It's going to be over one day and our country will be safe again."




The COVID-19 crisis in South Sudan - photo by Clara Simon

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: John
Age: 32
Profession: Charcoal vendor
Location: Munuki, South Sudan

"My supply has been affected since the crisis started. This means I don't have enough charcoal to sell and I don't make enough money to meet my needs.

Without an income, you can’t be healthy. That is why I am still here in my shop and still seeing customers every day, although I am not supposed to meet any people.

I even fear for my safety when I'm interacting with customers, but I have to keep my business going.

I have a wife and two children and also some relatives live in our house as well. This affects everyone in my family. They depend on my income. We all eat much less now.

Any kind of support would be very welcome, like food, soap or even money.

I really hope life will return to normal."




The COVID-19 crisis in South Sudan - photo by Clara Simon

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: John
Age: 32
Profession: Charcoal vendor
Location: Munuki, South Sudan

"My supply has been affected since the crisis started. This means I don't have enough charcoal to sell and I don't make enough money to meet my needs.

Without an income, you can’t be healthy. That is why I am still here in my shop and still seeing customers every day, although I am not supposed to meet any people.

I even fear for my safety when I'm interacting with customers, but I have to keep my business going.

I have a wife and two children and also some relatives live in our house as well. This affects everyone in my family. They depend on my income. We all eat much less now.

Any kind of support would be very welcome, like food, soap or even money.

I really hope life will return to normal."




The COVID-19 crisis in South Sudan - photo by Clara Simon

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Amina
Age: 28
Profession: Hairdresser
Location: Mauna, South Sudan

"I can barely provide for myself anymore. It is very difficult to make a living nowadays, as people won’t come to the salon.

I'm even afraid of them if they do come because I don’t know who they have been in contact with. This is very bad for business.

I am worried about my health, but also income is a great concern. I struggle to make ends meet.

I don’t have any children but I have people I take care of. I have to provide for my parents.

We need food and money. Anything is fine as long as it keeps me alive."




The COVID-19 crisis in the Central African Republic - photo by Zigoto Tchaya

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Derrick Mazangue
Age: 20
Profession: Cell phone credit vendor
Location: Bangui, Central African Republic

"COVID-19 has affected me a lot. My business was going just fine. A lot of people would pass-by and buy their phone credit at my stand. This road was always very busy. Now people are supposed to stay at home and I lost many customers. I can't eat well. Everything seems to be happening in slow motion.

My main concern is not even my health. My biggest problem is money. I am not a civil servant. I don't have a monthly salary. I only rely on my business to get by and to help my two little brothers.

On top of that, I can no longer hug my friends and relatives. This coronavirus has turned the world upside down.

Some people wear masks and others don't. I wash my hands too much. I don't visit my friends and I don't have any money anymore.

I don't get any support either since my parents are no longer alive and I am the one who has to take care of my brothers.

It's difficult. With the coronavirus going around, we can't move forward. The future is blurry. It's painful to think like that.

For now, the only thing we can do is to respect the instructions from the government and the world health organization. Social distance, cough in your elbow or in a handkerchief and throw it out. Stay indoors."




The COVID-19 crisis in the Central African Republic - photo by Zigoto Tchaya

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Roger Mboliss
Age: 67
Profession: Bar owner
Location: Bangui, Central African Republic

"I am the owner and manager of my own bar here in Bangui. The coronavirus has put us in all a socio-economic disorder.

My son went to Congo Kinshasa for a holiday. Three days before his return to Bangui, the borders closed because of the corona pandemic. He can't come back until the ban is lifted.

My son should be here now to continue his school. He is suffering where he is now. I have to send him money because he can't work there. This affects me as well. This is too much suffering for me and my family.

Health comes first. Since the corona pandemic is ravaging the whole world, I have to protect my family. It is a universal health problem. Money comes second. Everyone needs money, but health should come first.

I am married and a father of 9 children. I no longer go out of the house. I stay inside with my children. It is difficult to control the kids during this period. They are very rowdy. The noise is too much.

Before I started selling drinks, I was a truck driver. I used to deliver wood. I had my own truck and thieves stole it during the war that destroyed our country in 2013. After the war, I used all the money had saved to start a bar.

Now I sell about 4 crates a week. Before the crisis, I sold 25 a day. Times have gotten very tough.

I am an old man. I don’t have the energy to do start another business to generate an income. So I really need financial support right now.

This corona thing is the most dangerous health problem that I have heard of in my lifetime. It will only improve if people respect the instructions of the government. Otherwise, the number of infections and many people will die.

It is very simple. Keep a distance of at least one meter from each other. No overcrowding."





Imágenes automáticamente encargadas desde flickr con para tags : (centrafrique,centralafricanrepublic)