Central African Republic : Photos

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KABO, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC - DECEMBER 17: A boy looks out from a line formed for measles vaccination shots after 8 cases were reported in the area at a hospital December 17, 2007 in Kabo in the northern Central African Republic. Central African Republic (CAR) is one of the world?s poorest and most neglected countries with an average life expectancy of 39 years. Decades of fighting various rebel factions in the north of the country have resulted in hundreds of deaths and over 200,000 internally displaced people. Outside of the capital Bangui there is no electricity or paved roads and banditry is extensive. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)




Photo du jour - 15 Juillet 2020 / Photo of the day - 15 July 2020

Bangui - Le processus d’enrôlement des électeurs suit son cours dans le cadre des préparatifs des élections 2020-2021. Ici, un jeune centrafricain se fait inscrire sur la liste des électeurs au centre de vote de l’école Gbaya Dombia, dans le 3ème arrondissement de Bangui.

Bangui - Voter registration continues in preparation for the 2020-2021 elections. Here, a young Central African is being registered on the electoral list at the Gbaya Dombia School voting center in Bangui’s 3rd district.

Photo: UN/MINUSCA - Boris Ngouagouni




Photo du jour - 14 Juillet 2020 / Photo of the day - 14 July 2020

Ndélé (Nord de la RCA) - Sensibilisation, les 13 et 14 juillet 2020, des chefs de quartiers, les leaders communautaires et religieux sur le processus électoral. Les bénéficiaires serviront de relais auprès des habitants de leurs quartiers. Organisée par la section électorale de la MINUSCA et l’Autorité sous-préfectorale des élections, cette activité a pour objectif d’encourager la population à s’inscrire massivement sur la liste électorale.

Ndélé (Northern CAR) - Awareness raising session, from July 13 to 14, 2020, for community and religious leaders on the electoral process. This session will allow them to pass on the knowledge acquired to the residents of their neighborhoods. Organized by the MINUSCA electoral component and the Sub-prefectural electoral authority, this activity aims to encourage the population to massively register on the electoral list.

Photo: UN/MINUSCA - Honoré Samedi




Centrafrican Airlines | Ilyushin IL-76TD | TN-AFS | Ras Al Khaimah

Dennis HKG posted a photo:

Centrafrican Airlines | Ilyushin IL-76TD | TN-AFS | Ras Al Khaimah




2006_5054

Bangui 2006

2006 Central African Republic, Bangui la coquette.




The COVID-19 crisis in South Sudan - photo by Clara Simon

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Amina
Age: 28
Profession: Hairdresser
Location: Mauna, South Sudan

"I can barely provide for myself anymore. It is very difficult to make a living nowadays, as people won’t come to the salon.

I'm even afraid of them if they do come because I don’t know who they have been in contact with. This is very bad for business.

I am worried about my health, but also income is a great concern. I struggle to make ends meet.

I don’t have any children but I have people I take care of. I have to provide for my parents.

We need food and money. Anything is fine as long as it keeps me alive."




The COVID-19 crisis in South Sudan - photo by Clara Simon

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Reida Gaba
Age: 46
Profession: Vegetable vendor
Location: Juba, South Sudan

"Since the crisis started, I’m not making enough money anymore. I struggle to sell enough in a day to afford other basics like soap, salt and medicines.

My income is my main concern. If there is no income to buy food, my children and I will not survive.

I have seven children. Because of the coronacrisis we only have one meal a day. All we eat is what is leftover from my stand at the end of the day. Jus vegetables.

We need help. It is such a terrible feeling when it is 4 pm and I haven’t sold anything yet and the children are expecting me to buy something like small fish, just to have an addition to the vegetables they have already been eating the whole week. Sometimes it makes me feel like crying.

I just hope things will get back to the way they were before corona."




The COVID-19 crisis in South Sudan - photo by Clara Simon

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: John
Age: 32
Profession: Charcoal vendor
Location: Munuki, South Sudan

"My supply has been affected since the crisis started. This means I don't have enough charcoal to sell and I don't make enough money to meet my needs.

Without an income, you can’t be healthy. That is why I am still here in my shop and still seeing customers every day, although I am not supposed to meet any people.

I even fear for my safety when I'm interacting with customers, but I have to keep my business going.

I have a wife and two children and also some relatives live in our house as well. This affects everyone in my family. They depend on my income. We all eat much less now.

Any kind of support would be very welcome, like food, soap or even money.

I really hope life will return to normal."




The COVID-19 crisis in the Central African Republic - photo by Zigoto Tchaya

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Derrick Mazangue
Age: 20
Profession: Cell phone credit vendor
Location: Bangui, Central African Republic

"COVID-19 has affected me a lot. My business was going just fine. A lot of people would pass-by and buy their phone credit at my stand. This road was always very busy. Now people are supposed to stay at home and I lost many customers. I can't eat well. Everything seems to be happening in slow motion.

My main concern is not even my health. My biggest problem is money. I am not a civil servant. I don't have a monthly salary. I only rely on my business to get by and to help my two little brothers.

On top of that, I can no longer hug my friends and relatives. This coronavirus has turned the world upside down.

Some people wear masks and others don't. I wash my hands too much. I don't visit my friends and I don't have any money anymore.

I don't get any support either since my parents are no longer alive and I am the one who has to take care of my brothers.

It's difficult. With the coronavirus going around, we can't move forward. The future is blurry. It's painful to think like that.

For now, the only thing we can do is to respect the instructions from the government and the world health organization. Social distance, cough in your elbow or in a handkerchief and throw it out. Stay indoors."




The COVID-19 crisis in the Central African Republic - photo by Zigoto Tchaya

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Derrick Mazangue
Age: 20
Profession: Cell phone credit vendor
Location: Bangui, Central African Republic

"COVID-19 has affected me a lot. My business was going just fine. A lot of people would pass-by and buy their phone credit at my stand. This road was always very busy. Now people are supposed to stay at home and I lost many customers. I can't eat well. Everything seems to be happening in slow motion.

My main concern is not even my health. My biggest problem is money. I am not a civil servant. I don't have a monthly salary. I only rely on my business to get by and to help my two little brothers.

On top of that, I can no longer hug my friends and relatives. This coronavirus has turned the world upside down.

Some people wear masks and others don't. I wash my hands too much. I don't visit my friends and I don't have any money anymore.

I don't get any support either since my parents are no longer alive and I am the one who has to take care of my brothers.

It's difficult. With the coronavirus going around, we can't move forward. The future is blurry. It's painful to think like that.

For now, the only thing we can do is to respect the instructions from the government and the world health organization. Social distance, cough in your elbow or in a handkerchief and throw it out. Stay indoors."




The COVID-19 crisis in the Central African Republic - photo by Zigoto Tchaya

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Marie-Rose Mefoungi
Age: 60
Profession: Cook
Location: Bangui, Central African Republic

"This crisis is very serious. I used to be able to sell 50 to 60 fish a day. But, today, I can't anymore. They asked us to stay inside our house. I need to go out to work, but then I risk getting infected.

I'm already struggling with my health, but money is still my greatest concern right now. We already lost a lot during the war. Corona has added even more wounds. It's too much.

Does this disease even really exist? I don't know. I really can’t tell. I don't understand why the number of cases increases every day but people are not dying in this country. Are those figures from the government? Don't you think it's suspicious? I don't get it.

We were living in a house that I had built with my husband, who now suffers from a stroke. We fled the violence in 2013 to take refuge in this neighbourhood. Now I am renting and it is difficult for me, my husband and my 7 children.

I don't have any backup. I'm in a lot of pain. Who will support me? The government could have given us a little support to get us through this period. But nothing. How are we going to get out of this?

Despite all this, I'm still a positive woman. I'm religious and very hopeful that this virus will one day be over. Before it was AIDS and cholera. Now we don't talk about those diseases anymore.

Corona is not the black man's disease. Planes brought it here. It's going to be over one day and our country will be safe again."




The COVID-19 crisis in the Central African Republic - photo by Zigoto Tchaya

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Derrick Mazangue
Age: 20
Profession: Cell phone credit vendor
Location: Bangui, Central African Republic

"COVID-19 has affected me a lot. My business was going just fine. A lot of people would pass-by and buy their phone credit at my stand. This road was always very busy. Now people are supposed to stay at home and I lost many customers. I can't eat well. Everything seems to be happening in slow motion.

My main concern is not even my health. My biggest problem is money. I am not a civil servant. I don't have a monthly salary. I only rely on my business to get by and to help my two little brothers.

On top of that, I can no longer hug my friends and relatives. This coronavirus has turned the world upside down.

Some people wear masks and others don't. I wash my hands too much. I don't visit my friends and I don't have any money anymore.

I don't get any support either since my parents are no longer alive and I am the one who has to take care of my brothers.

It's difficult. With the coronavirus going around, we can't move forward. The future is blurry. It's painful to think like that.

For now, the only thing we can do is to respect the instructions from the government and the world health organization. Social distance, cough in your elbow or in a handkerchief and throw it out. Stay indoors."




The COVID-19 crisis in the Central African Republic - photo by Zigoto Tchaya

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Marie-Rose Mefoungi
Age: 60
Profession: Cook
Location: Bangui, Central African Republic

"This crisis is very serious. I used to be able to sell 50 to 60 fish a day. But, today, I can't anymore. They asked us to stay inside our house. I need to go out to work, but then I risk getting infected.

I'm already struggling with my health, but money is still my greatest concern right now. We already lost a lot during the war. Corona has added even more wounds. It's too much.

Does this disease even really exist? I don't know. I really can’t tell. I don't understand why the number of cases increases every day but people are not dying in this country. Are those figures from the government? Don't you think it's suspicious? I don't get it.

We were living in a house that I had built with my husband, who now suffers from a stroke. We fled the violence in 2013 to take refuge in this neighbourhood. Now I am renting and it is difficult for me, my husband and my 7 children.

I don't have any backup. I'm in a lot of pain. Who will support me? The government could have given us a little support to get us through this period. But nothing. How are we going to get out of this?

Despite all this, I'm still a positive woman. I'm religious and very hopeful that this virus will one day be over. Before it was AIDS and cholera. Now we don't talk about those diseases anymore.

Corona is not the black man's disease. Planes brought it here. It's going to be over one day and our country will be safe again."




What is it like to live in a war-torn country in times of the COVID-19 pandemic?

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.




The COVID-19 crisis in South Sudan - photo by Clara Simon

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.




The COVID-19 crisis in the Central African Republic - photo by Zigoto Tchaya

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Roger Mboliss
Age: 67
Profession: Bar owner
Location: Bangui, Central African Republic

"I am the owner and manager of my own bar here in Bangui. The coronavirus has put us in all a socio-economic disorder.

My son went to Congo Kinshasa for a holiday. Three days before his return to Bangui, the borders closed because of the corona pandemic. He can't come back until the ban is lifted.

My son should be here now to continue his school. He is suffering where he is now. I have to send him money because he can't work there. This affects me as well. This is too much suffering for me and my family.

Health comes first. Since the corona pandemic is ravaging the whole world, I have to protect my family. It is a universal health problem. Money comes second. Everyone needs money, but health should come first.

I am married and a father of 9 children. I no longer go out of the house. I stay inside with my children. It is difficult to control the kids during this period. They are very rowdy. The noise is too much.

Before I started selling drinks, I was a truck driver. I used to deliver wood. I had my own truck and thieves stole it during the war that destroyed our country in 2013. After the war, I used all the money had saved to start a bar.

Now I sell about 4 crates a week. Before the crisis, I sold 25 a day. Times have gotten very tough.

I am an old man. I don’t have the energy to do start another business to generate an income. So I really need financial support right now.

This corona thing is the most dangerous health problem that I have heard of in my lifetime. It will only improve if people respect the instructions of the government. Otherwise, the number of infections and many people will die.

It is very simple. Keep a distance of at least one meter from each other. No overcrowding."




The COVID-19 crisis in South Sudan - photo by Clara Simon

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Okumu John
Age: 26
Profession: Carpenter
Location: Gudele, South Sudan

"Since the pandemic, I can't work in my business anymore. I can't buy the materials I need. I can’t work on my marketing activities.

And I can't go out with my friends.

I'm very concerned about my income. Before corona, I was doing fine. Now I'm struggling.

I don’t have any children. I live with my brothers, we all work in the carpentry workshop. My parents live in Torit and I provide for them. I send them money and food. Now I can't because there is no money anymore.

I wish this was over soon, so I can travel to see my parents and generate an income again."




The COVID-19 crisis in the Central African Republic - photo by Zigoto Tchaya

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Marie-Rose Mefoungi
Age: 60
Profession: Cook
Location: Bangui, Central African Republic

"This crisis is very serious. I used to be able to sell 50 to 60 fish a day. But, today, I can't anymore. They asked us to stay inside our house. I need to go out to work, but then I risk getting infected.

I'm already struggling with my health, but money is still my greatest concern right now. We already lost a lot during the war. Corona has added even more wounds. It's too much.

Does this disease even really exist? I don't know. I really can’t tell. I don't understand why the number of cases increases every day but people are not dying in this country. Are those figures from the government? Don't you think it's suspicious? I don't get it.

We were living in a house that I had built with my husband, who now suffers from a stroke. We fled the violence in 2013 to take refuge in this neighbourhood. Now I am renting and it is difficult for me, my husband and my 7 children.

I don't have any backup. I'm in a lot of pain. Who will support me? The government could have given us a little support to get us through this period. But nothing. How are we going to get out of this?

Despite all this, I'm still a positive woman. I'm religious and very hopeful that this virus will one day be over. Before it was AIDS and cholera. Now we don't talk about those diseases anymore.

Corona is not the black man's disease. Planes brought it here. It's going to be over one day and our country will be safe again."




The COVID-19 crisis in the Central African Republic - photo by Zigoto Tchaya

Reporters took to the streets of cities in South Sudan, Central African Republic and Afghanistan to ask people what the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is on their lives.

Name: Gertrude Nardine Setou
Age: 39
Profession: Fruit and vegetable vendor
Location: Bangui, Central African Republic

"The corona crisis has seriously devastated my life a great deal. I no longer make enough money to look after my children. I used to travel to another town, some 150 kilometres away, to buy and sell tomatoes and carrots. The transport fair has become unaffordable because the government no longer wants drivers to overload their busses with passengers due to the pandemic. Also, the goods I usually buy and sell have become way more expensive.

I am a mother of 5 children. My husband died 7 months ago. It is difficult for me to survive with my c