Soudan : Photos

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Man on camel. Tenna Village, Sodari Locality, North Kordofan State, Sudan. (Photo: Sarah Farhat/ The World Bank)




SPMO

His Excellency meeting with eldhamer Sultan local community Leader




SPMO

His Excellency meeting with eldhamer Sultan local community Leader




SPMO

His Excellency meeting with eldhamer Sultan local community Leader




SPMO

His Excellency meeting with eldhamer Sultan local community Leader




Savanair | Antonov An-12 | D2-FDC | Sharjah International

Dennis HKG posted a photo:

Savanair | Antonov An-12 | D2-FDC | Sharjah International




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Spirit of Africa | Boeing 707-300 | ST-AQI | Sharjah International

Dennis HKG posted a photo:

Spirit of Africa | Boeing 707-300 | ST-AQI | Sharjah International




St. Martin's Place

This is a postcard published by F. Hartmann of 45 Farringdon Road and printed in Saxony. Hartmann was one of the voices which convinced the GPO to change its rules and allow a divided back postcard to be used so that messages could be written on the reverse instead of the obverse where publishers had been leaving blank spaces for messages. This postcard has a divided back and is unused and dates from just before the change in the rules. The view is looking roughly north west from St. Martin’s Place with the corner of the National Portrait Gallery on the left, the offices of the Corporation of Westminster on the right and the southern end of Charing Cross Road in the centre. The statue is of General Charles George Gordon wearing the uniform of an Egyptian General as Governor General of the Sudan. The circumstances surrounding the death of Gordon are well known so I will not go into them here, save to say that his death at the hands of the Mahdi caused a great swell of sympathy and indignation amongst the British public which lasted for some time. The statue is a copy of one which was commissioned by a committee of Royal Engineer and artillery officers of the army who sought funds so that several memorials to the General could be made. The statue is by Edward Onslow Ford who like many 19th Century British Sculptors had received training in Germany, at the time of the commission he was in his late 30s and a member of the Royal Academy. The statue of Gordon riding a camel was placed in front of the Royal Engineer Institute at Old Brompton Barracks in Chatham and was unveiled by the Prince of Wales accompanied by the Duke of Cambridge, the head of the Army, on Monday 19th May 1890. It is now a Grade II listed monument and has been there for 130 years unlike the second casting which was due to become an international traveller and had several homes. In 1898 an Anglo-Egyptian army under the command of Lord Herbert Kitchener defeated the Mahdi’s successor, Abdullah-al-Taashie at the Battle of Omdurman, in the wake of the victory Kitchener appealed to the British public for funds to create a college for Sudanese students in Khartoum and a statue of Gordon to be place near where he was killed. The “Morning Post” newspaper took up the call for the funding of the statue and its readers contributed the cash in quick time, funds were also obtained for the College which became known as the Gordon College and was opened by Lord Kitchener on Sunday 9th November 1902, however the statue was still in transit. It was felt by the organisers of the appeal that the statue should be displayed in London before being shipped to the Sudan especially as it was a Coronation year, to this end the Corporation of Westminster agreed to have the statue displayed outside their offices in St. Martin’s Place on a traffic island which is now the home of the Nurse Edith Cavell statue and memorial. The Gordon statue was unveiled by the Duke of Cambridge, no longer head of the Army, on Friday 18th July 1902. The sculptor of the statue, Edward Onslow Ford, had overseen the recasting at the Bronze foundry after making a few changes to the original design, he caught a chill whilst at the foundry which turned into double pneumonia from which he died at the age of 49 years, his best work was expected to be still ahead of him and his loss was a great blow to British sculpture. The statue was placed aboard the SS Cedardene at Millwall Docks and she set sail for Alexandria on a very foggy 9th October, she hadn’t gone too far down the Thames when she was in a collision with a Russian ship bound for Riga. The Captain steered her to shore where she sank, she was refloated very quickly and returned to Millwall Docks where the now very muddy statue and wooden case were unloaded and hosed down and it was reported, none the worse for the experience. A few days later the statue was placed aboard the SS Lesbian for another attempt which was successful, and she arrived at Alexandria in mid-November. The statue remained on the Quay for the next seven weeks before it was put on a Nile steamer on 29th January 1903 for the two-week journey to Khartoum. Some reports say that the Nile steamer also sank whilst in transit but I have not been able to confirm this, in any event the statue arrived at Khartoum where it was placed on a ready made plinth by soldiers of the Egyptian army and there it stayed for the next 55 years until December 1958 when it was re-veiled in a ceremony attended by members of the British and Sudanese army and placed in the Khartoum museum. The Sudan had declared Independence from Britain and Egypt in 1955, both Governments recognised its Independence on 1st January 1956. In 1958 as a gesture of friendship the Sudanese Government gave the Gordon statue and a subsequent statue of Lord Kitchener to the British People, thereby making space in their museum and both began the long journey back to the UK. The statues left Alexandria on the Royal Fleet Auxiliary Ship, Fort Dunvegan and arrived at Chatham on 25th March 1959. The Kitchener statue was donated to the School of Military Engineering at Chatham and the Gordon statue was sent to the Gordon Boys Home in Woking. The home was founded in 1885 and moved to Woking in 1887. It became a school in the early 1960s and now has Academy status. In 2014 the statue underwent a full restoration by UK Bronze, I wonder whether they found any Thames mud?




SPMO Daily Work's

His Excellency SPM meeting with Wali




SPMO Daily Work's

His Excellency SPM meeting with Wali




SPMO Daily Work's

His Excellency SPM meeting with Wali




SPMO Daily Work's

His Excellency SPM meeting with Wali




The Work at Sunset

Mundari cattle camp at sunset (Terekeka, South Sudan).

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