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Abdirahman D. Beileh,Somali finance minister and Raj M. Desai, nonresident senior fellow in Brookings’ Global Economy and Development, take audience’s questions at a Brookings event on economic adjustment in conflict-affected and fragile states in Africa.

Fragile states in Africa, like Somalia, are grappling with tensions and tradeoffs between development imperatives and stabilization objectives, the need for economic stimulus and debt sustainability, and global financial stewardship and transparency. At the same time such countries need to focus on strengthening local public and private sector capacity. Indeed, the two countries are confronting extraordinary development challenges, including with respect to development finance. For more than a decade, the international community has stepped up efforts to engage more effectively with fragile states whose economic performance is impaired by limited administrative capacity, persistent social tensions, ongoing conflict, and political instability.

The International Monetary Fund and World Bank are engaged in some form in almost all fragile states to improve economic management and performance, reduce poverty, and improve governance. Development assistance is inherently risky in these environments, where weak policies and institutions correlate with a lower probability of successful outcomes. Despite the risks, there is a strong rationale for engagement as the impact of well-designed and supervised aid-financed programs can potentially be very high.

On October 17, the Brookings Africa Growth Initiative and the Brookings Doha Center hosted Finance Minister Abdirahman Duale Beileh of Somalia for a conversation on these and related issues.

Photo Credit: Paul Morigi




(R-L) Raj M. Desai, nonresident fellow at Brookings moderates a conversation with Abdirahman D. Beileh, Somali finance minister, on economic adjustment in conflict-affected and fragile African states, at a Brookings Africa Growth Initiative event.

Fragile states in Africa, like Somalia, are grappling with tensions and tradeoffs between development imperatives and stabilization objectives, the need for economic stimulus and debt sustainability, and global financial stewardship and transparency. At the same time such countries need to focus on strengthening local public and private sector capacity. Indeed, the two countries are confronting extraordinary development challenges, including with respect to development finance. For more than a decade, the international community has stepped up efforts to engage more effectively with fragile states whose economic performance is impaired by limited administrative capacity, persistent social tensions, ongoing conflict, and political instability.

The International Monetary Fund and World Bank are engaged in some form in almost all fragile states to improve economic management and performance, reduce poverty, and improve governance. Development assistance is inherently risky in these environments, where weak policies and institutions correlate with a lower probability of successful outcomes. Despite the risks, there is a strong rationale for engagement as the impact of well-designed and supervised aid-financed programs can potentially be very high.

On October 17, the Brookings Africa Growth Initiative and the Brookings Doha Center hosted Finance Minister Abdirahman Duale Beileh of Somalia for a conversation on these and related issues.

Photo Credit: Paul Morigi




(L-R) Finance Minister Abdirahman Duale Beileh of Somalia in a conversation with Raj M. Desai, nonresident senior fellow in Brookings’ Global Economy and Development, on economic adjustment in conflict-affected and fragile states in Africa.

Fragile states in Africa, like Somalia, are grappling with tensions and tradeoffs between development imperatives and stabilization objectives, the need for economic stimulus and debt sustainability, and global financial stewardship and transparency. At the same time such countries need to focus on strengthening local public and private sector capacity. Indeed, the two countries are confronting extraordinary development challenges, including with respect to development finance. For more than a decade, the international community has stepped up efforts to engage more effectively with fragile states whose economic performance is impaired by limited administrative capacity, persistent social tensions, ongoing conflict, and political instability.

The International Monetary Fund and World Bank are engaged in some form in almost all fragile states to improve economic management and performance, reduce poverty, and improve governance. Development assistance is inherently risky in these environments, where weak policies and institutions correlate with a lower probability of successful outcomes. Despite the risks, there is a strong rationale for engagement as the impact of well-designed and supervised aid-financed programs can potentially be very high.

On October 17, the Brookings Africa Growth Initiative and the Brookings Doha Center hosted Finance Minister Abdirahman Duale Beileh of Somalia for a conversation on these and related issues.

Photo Credit: Paul Morigi




Abdirahman Duale Beileh, finance minister of Somali answers audience’s questions at an event on economic adjustment in conflict-affected and fragile states in Africa, hosted by Africa Growth Initiative at The Brookings Institution.

Fragile states in Africa, like Somalia, are grappling with tensions and tradeoffs between development imperatives and stabilization objectives, the need for economic stimulus and debt sustainability, and global financial stewardship and transparency. At the same time such countries need to focus on strengthening local public and private sector capacity. Indeed, the two countries are confronting extraordinary development challenges, including with respect to development finance. For more than a decade, the international community has stepped up efforts to engage more effectively with fragile states whose economic performance is impaired by limited administrative capacity, persistent social tensions, ongoing conflict, and political instability.

The International Monetary Fund and World Bank are engaged in some form in almost all fragile states to improve economic management and performance, reduce poverty, and improve governance. Development assistance is inherently risky in these environments, where weak policies and institutions correlate with a lower probability of successful outcomes. Despite the risks, there is a strong rationale for engagement as the impact of well-designed and supervised aid-financed programs can potentially be very high.

On October 17, the Brookings Africa Growth Initiative and the Brookings Doha Center hosted Finance Minister Abdirahman Duale Beileh of Somalia for a conversation on these and related issues.

Photo Credit: Paul Morigi




Brahima Coulibaly,senior fellow in Brookings’ Global Economy and Development and director of the Brookings’ Africa Growth Initiative, delivers the introductory remarks at an AGI event on economic adjustment in conflict-affected and fragile African states.

Fragile states in Africa, like Somalia, are grappling with tensions and tradeoffs between development imperatives and stabilization objectives, the need for economic stimulus and debt sustainability, and global financial stewardship and transparency. At the same time such countries need to focus on strengthening local public and private sector capacity. Indeed, the two countries are confronting extraordinary development challenges, including with respect to development finance. For more than a decade, the international community has stepped up efforts to engage more effectively with fragile states whose economic performance is impaired by limited administrative capacity, persistent social tensions, ongoing conflict, and political instability.

The International Monetary Fund and World Bank are engaged in some form in almost all fragile states to improve economic management and performance, reduce poverty, and improve governance. Development assistance is inherently risky in these environments, where weak policies and institutions correlate with a lower probability of successful outcomes. Despite the risks, there is a strong rationale for engagement as the impact of well-designed and supervised aid-financed programs can potentially be very high.

On October 17, the Brookings Africa Growth Initiative and the Brookings Doha Center hosted Finance Minister Abdirahman Duale Beileh of Somalia for a conversation on these and related issues.

Photo Credit: Paul Morigi




Ilhan Omar Biography

Ilhan Omar was born October 4, 1981 in Somalia. Ilhan Omar and her family fled the country’s civil war when she was eight-years-old. They lived in a refugee camp in Kenya for four years before coming to the United States, eventually settling in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood of Minneapolis in 1997. Ilhan Omar Biography and Profile. Read more


www.goodreadbiography.com/ilhan-omar-biography/




Seed distribution

Women wait to receive seeds from a trader in Bullo Jadiid village, Baidoa district, 250km south of Mogadishu, Somalia. FAO is running a seed voucher programme in conjunction with local traders.

Read more about FAO and Somalia.

Photo credit must be given: ©FAO/Ismail Taxta. Editorial use only. Copyright FAO




Input distribution

Hassan Ali, 56 years old, collects seeds from a trader in Bullo Jadiid village, Baidoa district, 250km south of Mogadishu, Somalia. FAO is running a seed voucher programme in conjunction with local traders.

Read more about FAO and Somalia.

Photo credit must be given: ©FAO/Ismail Taxta. Editorial use only. Copyright FAO




Crop seeds

Muslimo Hajji, 58 years old, inspects seeds from a trader in Humboole village, Baidoa district, 250km south of Mogadishu, Somalia. FAO is running a seed voucher programme in conjunction with local traders.

Read more about FAO and Somalia.

Photo credit must be given: ©FAO/Ismail Taxta. Editorial use only. Copyright FAO




Verifing identity

Mohamed Hassan Mohamed, 57 years old, waits to receive seeds from a trader in Humboole village, Baidoa district, 250km south of Mogadishu, Somalia. FAO is running a seed voucher programme in conjunction with local traders.

Read more about FAO and Somalia.

Photo credit must be given: ©FAO/Ismail Taxta. Editorial use only. Copyright FAO




Back home

Men wait to receive seeds from trader in Bullo Jadiid village, Baidoa district, 250km south of Mogadishu, Somalia. FAO is running a seed voucher programme in conjunction with local traders.

Read more about FAO and Somalia.

Photo credit must be given: ©FAO/Ismail Taxta. Editorial use only. Copyright FAO




Input distribution

Mohamed Hassan Mohamed, 57 years old, receives seeds from a trader in Humboole village, Baidoa district, 250km south of Mogadishu, Somalia. FAO is running a seed voucher programme in conjunction with local traders.

Read more about FAO and Somalia.

Photo credit must be given: ©FAO/Ismail Taxta. Editorial use only. Copyright FAO




Registration

Hassan Hashi Awale, Project Manager for CDI, holds a registration file as he directs people in Bullo Jadiid village, Baidoa district, 250km south of Mogadishu, Somalia. FAO is running a seed voucher programme in conjunction with local traders.

Read more about FAO and Somalia.

Photo credit must be given: ©FAO/Ismail Taxta. Editorial use only. Copyright FAO




FAO EU project

A man waits to receive seeds from trader in Bullo Jadiid village, Baidoa district, 250km south of Mogadishu, Somalia. FAO is running a seed voucher programme in conjunction with local traders.

Read more about FAO and Somalia.

Photo credit must be given: ©FAO/Ismail Taxta. Editorial use only. Copyright FAO




Verifing identity

A woman verifies her identity in order to collect seeds in Bullo Jadiid village, Baidoa district, 250km south of Mogadishu, Somalia. FAO is running a seed voucher programme in conjunction with local traders.

Read more about FAO and Somalia.

Photo credit must be given: ©FAO/Ismail Taxta. Editorial use only. Copyright FAO




Sorghum seeds

Mohamed Sheikh, 70 years old, inspects sorghum seeds from a trader to verify their quality in Bullo Jadiid village, Baidoa district, 250km south of Mogadishu, Somalia. FAO is running a seed voucher programme in conjunction with local traders.

Read more about FAO and Somalia.

Photo credit must be given: ©FAO/Ismail Taxta. Editorial use only. Copyright FAO




Registration document

A woman holds her registration document as she waits to receive seeds from a trader in Bullo Jadiid village, Baidoa district, 250km south of Mogadishu, Somalia. FAO is running a seed voucher programme in conjunction with local traders.

Read more about FAO and Somalia.

Photo credit must be given: ©FAO/Ismail Taxta. Editorial use only. Copyright FAO




Back home

Mohamed Hassan Mohamed, 57 years old, receives seeds from a trader in Humboole village, Baidoa district, 250km south of Mogadishu, Somalia. FAO is running a seed voucher programme in conjunction with local traders.

Read more about FAO and Somalia.

Photo credit must be given: ©FAO/Ismail Taxta. Editorial use only. Copyright FAO




Seed distribution

A view of the seed distribution at Bullo Jadiid village, Baidoa district, 250km south of Mogadishu, Somalia. FAO is running a seed voucher programme in conjunction with local traders.

Read more about FAO and Somalia.

Photo credit must be given: ©FAO/Ismail Taxta. Editorial use only. Copyright FAO




Crop seeds

Mohamed Hassan Mohamed, 57 years old, shows the crops he grows on his farm in Humboole village, Baidoa district, 250km south of Mogadishu, Somalia. FAO is running a seed voucher programme in conjunction with local traders.

Read more about FAO and Somalia.

Photo credit must be given: ©FAO/Ismail Taxta. Editorial use only. Copyright FAO





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