Liberia : Photos

Découvrez chaque jours des Photos des différents pays d'Afrique et des Antilles

Toutes les images proviennent du service de partage de photo flickr

Utilisez le menu de gauche pour choisir un pays.




Nigerian Peacekeepers Serving with UNMIL

In Liberia, successive Nigerian contingents were instrumental in the UN Mission's efforts to help disarm more than 100,000 fighters and to assist with a series of elections. Above, voters inspecting ballot papers on election day in Montserrado in October 2005.

UN Photo/Eric Kanalstein




James Otto from Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) teaches members of the Jogbahn Clan about land rights

BLAYAH TOWN, LIBERIA: Aug. 30, 2017 - The Jogbahn Clan fought against the British-owned company Equatorial Palm Oil (EPO) when they tried to take over their land in 2013. The people in the community depend on the land for their livelihoods. The Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) started to help the community by submitting a formal complaint to the to the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). SDI taught the clan about land rights and resisting with non-violence. THE RSPO determined that the land EPO was using belonged to the clan. SGI trained the community how to map their land and boundaries were created that EPO accepted not to cross. Photo by Morgana Wingard




James Otto from Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) teaches members of the Jogbahn Clan about land rights

BLAYAH TOWN, LIBERIA: Aug. 30, 2017 - The Jogbahn Clan fought against the British-owned company Equatorial Palm Oil (EPO) when they tried to take over their land in 2013. The people in the community depend on the land for their livelihoods. The Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) started to help the community by submitting a formal complaint to the to the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). SDI taught the clan about land rights and resisting with non-violence. THE RSPO determined that the land EPO was using belonged to the clan. SGI trained the community how to map their land and boundaries were created that EPO accepted not to cross. Photo by Morgana Wingard




The Accountability Lab building

MONROVIA, LIBERIA: August 28, 2017 - Following Liberia’s civil war, which ended in 2003, the government accelerated long-standing policies, which granted natural resource concessions to foreign companies. Since then, land in Liberia has been in high demand from foreign and national investors, particularly for palm oil plantations, mines, and timber concessions. In 2011, Liberia joined the Open Government Partnership committing to a dialogue on land rights and mapping land concessions. Since this time, it has finished two action plans. The third one will begin after President Sirleaf or the incoming president signs it. Through ongoing collaborative efforts by civil society and the government, more and more communities are learning about their land and finding a voice in discussions and debates about how to best move forward. In 2013, The Land Rights Act was introduced. If passed, it would legally recognize communities’ rights to their land. It also establishes safeguards to reduce discrimination against women and other vulnerable groups – who are often disproportionately affected by social and cultural barriers to using and owning land. Photos by Sarah Grile.




Ali Kaba, left, of the Sustainable Development Institute (SDI), at the Civil Society Organization (CSO) Working Group on Land Rights in Liberia meeting. .

MONROVIA, LIBERIA: Aug. 31, 2017 - The Civil Society Organization (CSO) Working Group on Land Rights in Liberia come together to discuss the language of the current draft of the Land Rights Act. The CSO working group has been working towards getting the bill passed since it was introduced in 2013. The Land Rights Act will make it so that there is a separation between private land, government land and community land. Photo by Sarah Grile.




James Otto from Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) teaches members of the Jogbahn Clan about land rights

BLAYAH TOWN, LIBERIA: Aug. 30, 2017 - The Jogbahn Clan fought against the British-owned company Equatorial Palm Oil (EPO) when they tried to take over their land in 2013. The people in the community depend on the land for their livelihoods. The Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) started to help the community by submitting a formal complaint to the to the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). SDI taught the clan about land rights and resisting with non-violence. THE RSPO determined that the land EPO was using belonged to the clan. SGI trained the community how to map their land and boundaries were created that EPO accepted not to cross. Photo by Morgana Wingard




170829-Liberia-Grile-0039

MONROVIA, LIBERIA: Aug. 29, 2017 - Andrew G. Temeh, Deputy Minister of Administration at the Ministry of Information (MICAT) and the OGP Focal Person, works at his desk on Tuesday, Aug. 29. Minister Temeh is working with OGP to create better transparency and accountability in the government. Liberia joined OGP in 2011.




James Otto from Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) teaches members of the Jogbahn Clan about land rights

BLAYAH TOWN, LIBERIA: Aug. 30, 2017 - The Jogbahn Clan fought against the British-owned company Equatorial Palm Oil (EPO) when they tried to take over their land in 2013. The people in the community depend on the land for their livelihoods. The Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) started to help the community by submitting a formal complaint to the to the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). SDI taught the clan about land rights and resisting with non-violence. THE RSPO determined that the land EPO was using belonged to the clan. SGI trained the community how to map their land and boundaries were created that EPO accepted not to cross. Photo by Morgana Wingard




170830-Liberia-Grile-0388

BLAYAH TOWN, LIBERIA: Aug. 30, 2017 - A woman eats fruit from a palm tree while in front of Garmondah Banwon's kitchen. Banwon is an elder in the Jogbahn Clan, beat cassava in front of the family's kitchen in Blayah Town. The Jogbahn Clan fought against the British-owned company Equatorial Palm Oil (EPO) when they tried to take over their land in 2013. The people in the community depend on the land for their livelihoods. The Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) started to help the community by submitting a formal complaint to the to the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). SDI taught the clan about land rights and resisting with non-violence. THE RSPO determined that the land EPO was using belonged to the clan. SGI trained the community how to map their land and boundaries were created that EPO accepted not to cross.




Constance Teage, left, of the Sustainable Development Institute (SDI), at the Civil Society Organization (CSO) Working Group on Land Rights in Liberia meeting. .

MONROVIA, LIBERIA: Aug. 31, 2017 - The Civil Society Organization (CSO) Working Group on Land Rights in Liberia come together to discuss the language of the current draft of the Land Rights Act. The CSO working group has been working towards getting the bill passed since it was introduced in 2013. The Land Rights Act will make it so that there is a separation between private land, government land and community land. Photo by Sarah Grile.




Cheo Johnson, chief of the Jogbahn Clan

BLAYAH TOWN, LIBERIA: Aug. 30, 2017 - The Jogbahn Clan fought against the British-owned company Equatorial Palm Oil (EPO) when they tried to take over their land in 2013. The people in the community depend on the land for their livelihoods. The Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) started to help the community by submitting a formal complaint to the to the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). SDI taught the clan about land rights and resisting with non-violence. THE RSPO determined that the land EPO was using belonged to the clan. SGI trained the community how to map their land and boundaries were created that EPO accepted not to cross. Photo by Morgana Wingard




Liberia Land Authority Building

MONROVIA, LIBERIA: September 1, 2017 - Following Liberia’s civil war, which ended in 2003, the government accelerated long-standing policies, which granted natural resource concessions to foreign companies. Since then, land in Liberia has been in high demand from foreign and national investors, particularly for palm oil plantations, mines, and timber concessions. In 2011, Liberia joined the Open Government Partnership committing to a dialogue on land rights and mapping land concessions. Since this time, it has finished two action plans. The third one will begin after President Sirleaf or the incoming president signs it. Through ongoing collaborative efforts by civil society and the government, more and more communities are learning about their land and finding a voice in discussions and debates about how to best move forward. In 2013, The Land Rights Act was introduced. If passed, it would legally recognize communities’ rights to their land. It also establishes safeguards to reduce discrimination against women and other vulnerable groups – who are often disproportionately affected by social and cultural barriers to using and owning land. Photo by Sarah Grile.




James Otto from Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) teaches members of the Jogbahn Clan about land rights

BLAYAH TOWN, LIBERIA: Aug. 30, 2017 - The Jogbahn Clan fought against the British-owned company Equatorial Palm Oil (EPO) when they tried to take over their land in 2013. The people in the community depend on the land for their livelihoods. The Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) started to help the community by submitting a formal complaint to the to the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). SDI taught the clan about land rights and resisting with non-violence. THE RSPO determined that the land EPO was using belonged to the clan. SGI trained the community how to map their land and boundaries were created that EPO accepted not to cross. Photo by Morgana Wingard




170829-Liberia-Grile-0012

MONROVIA, LIBERIA: Aug. 29, 2017 - Andrew G. Temeh, Deputy Minister of Administration at the Ministry of Information (MICAT) and the OGP Focal Person, works at his desk on Tuesday, Aug. 29. Minister Temeh is working with OGP to create better transparency and accountability in the government. Liberia joined OGP in 2011.




James Otto from Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) teaches members of the Jogbahn Clan about land rights

BLAYAH TOWN, LIBERIA: Aug. 30, 2017 - The Jogbahn Clan fought against the British-owned company Equatorial Palm Oil (EPO) when they tried to take over their land in 2013. The people in the community depend on the land for their livelihoods. The Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) started to help the community by submitting a formal complaint to the to the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). SDI taught the clan about land rights and resisting with non-violence. THE RSPO determined that the land EPO was using belonged to the clan. SGI trained the community how to map their land and boundaries were created that EPO accepted not to cross. Photo by Morgana Wingard




170830-Liberia-Grile-0331

BLAYAH TOWN, LIBERIA: Aug. 30, 2017 - Fruits from palm trees lie in front of Garmondah Banwon's kitchen in Blayah Town. Banwon is an elder in the the Jogbahn Clan. The Jogbahn Clan fought against the British-owned company Equatorial Palm Oil (EPO) when they tried to take over their land in 2013. The people in the community depend on the land for their livelihoods. The Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) started to help the community by submitting a formal complaint to the to the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). SDI taught the clan about land rights and resisting with non-violence. THE RSPO determined that the land EPO was using belonged to the clan. SGI trained the community how to map their land and boundaries were created that EPO accepted not to cross.




170830-Liberia-Grile-0244

BLAYAH TOWN, LIBERIA: Aug. 30, 2017 - Garmondah Banwon, an elder in the Jogbahn Clan, stands in his kitchen in Blayah Town. The Jogbahn Clan fought against the British-owned company Equatorial Palm Oil (EPO) when they tried to take over their land in 2013. The people in the community depend on the land for their livelihoods. The Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) started to help the community by submitting a formal complaint to the to the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). SDI taught the clan about land rights and resisting with non-violence. THE RSPO determined that the land EPO was using belonged to the clan. SGI trained the community how to map their land and boundaries were created that EPO accepted not to cross.




170829-Liberia-Grile-0002

MONROVIA, LIBERIA: Aug. 29, 2017 - Andrew G. Temeh, Deputy Minister of Administration at the Ministry of Information (MICAT) and the OGP Focal Person, works at his desk on Tuesday, Aug. 29. Minister Temeh is working with OGP to create better transparency and accountability in the government. Liberia joined OGP in 2011.




James Otto from Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) teaches members of the Jogbahn Clan about land rights

BLAYAH TOWN, LIBERIA: Aug. 30, 2017 - The Jogbahn Clan fought against the British-owned company Equatorial Palm Oil (EPO) when they tried to take over their land in 2013. The people in the community depend on the land for their livelihoods. The Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) started to help the community by submitting a formal complaint to the to the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). SDI taught the clan about land rights and resisting with non-violence. THE RSPO determined that the land EPO was using belonged to the clan. SGI trained the community how to map their land and boundaries were created that EPO accepted not to cross. Photo by Morgana Wingard




James Otto from Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) teaches members of the Jogbahn Clan about land rights

BLAYAH TOWN, LIBERIA: Aug. 30, 2017 - The Jogbahn Clan fought against the British-owned company Equatorial Palm Oil (EPO) when they tried to take over their land in 2013. The people in the community depend on the land for their livelihoods. The Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) started to help the community by submitting a formal complaint to the to the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). SDI taught the clan about land rights and resisting with non-violence. THE RSPO determined that the land EPO was using belonged to the clan. SGI trained the community how to map their land and boundaries were created that EPO accepted not to cross. Photo by Morgana Wingard





Images automatiquement chargées depuis flickr avec pour tags : (liberia)