Mauritius : Photos

Discover every day Photographs of the various countries of Africa and the Caribbean

All the photos are from the photo sharing website flickr

Use the left menu to choose a country.




table !

DOMVILL posted a photo:

 table !




2018_09_15-20_48_48-4845

2018-09-15 Kyan's 14th birthday




2018_09_15-20_43_39-4824

2018-09-15 Kyan's 14th birthday




2018_09_15-20_43_50-4828

2018-09-15 Kyan's 14th birthday




2018_09_15-20_44_32-4829

2018-09-15 Kyan's 14th birthday




2018_09_15-20_47_35-4841

2018-09-15 Kyan's 14th birthday




2018_09_15-20_45_29-4834

2018-09-15 Kyan's 14th birthday




2018_09_15-20_43_46-4825

2018-09-15 Kyan's 14th birthday




2018_09_15-20_40_32-4813

2018-09-15 Kyan's 14th birthday




2018_09_15-20_41_45-4816

2018-09-15 Kyan's 14th birthday




2018_09_15-20_41_49-4817

2018-09-15 Kyan's 14th birthday




2018_09_15-20_46_17-4837

2018-09-15 Kyan's 14th birthday




2018_09_15-20_42_39-4821

2018-09-15 Kyan's 14th birthday




2018_09_15-20_46_52-4839

2018-09-15 Kyan's 14th birthday




2018_09_15-20_42_10-4818

2018-09-15 Kyan's 14th birthday




2018_09_15-20_43_33-4823

2018-09-15 Kyan's 14th birthday




Ganesh Chaturthi 2018

Albion Mauritius




Festivals of India

Ganesh Chaturthi (IAST: Gaṇēśa Chaturthī), also known as Vinayaka Chaturthi (Vināyaka Chaturthī) or Vinayaka Chavithi (Vināyaka Chavithī) is a Hindu festival celebrating the birth of Ganesha.[2] A ten-day festival, it starts on the fourth day of Hindu Lunisolar calendar month Bhadrapada, which typically falls in the months of August or September of the Gregorian calendar. The festival is marked with the installation of Ganesha clay idols privately in homes, or publicly on elaborate pandals (temporary stages). Observations include chanting of Vedic hymns and Hindu texts such as Ganapati Upanishad, prayers and vrata (fasting).[2] Offerings and prasadam from the daily prayers, that is distributed from the pandal to the community, include sweets such as modaka believed to be a favorite of the elephant-headed deity.[3][4] The festival ends on the tenth day after start, wherein the idol is carried in a public procession with music and group chanting, then immersed in a nearby body of water such as a river or ocean. In Mumbai alone, around 150,000 statues are immersed annually.[5] thereafter the clay idol dissolves and Ganesha is believed to return to Mount Kailash to Parvati and Shiva.[2][6]

The festival celebrates Lord Ganesha as the God of New Beginnings and the Remover of Obstacles as well as the god of wisdom and intelligence[7][8] and is observed throughout India, especially in the states such as Maharashtra, Madhyapradesh, Karnataka, Goa, Telangana, Gujarat and Chhattisgarh,[2][9] and is usually celebrated privately at home in states such as Tamil Nadu, and Andhra Pradesh.[10] Ganesh Chaturthi is also observed in Nepal and by the Hindu diaspora elsewhere such as in Australia, Canada, Malaysia Trinidad, Suriname, Fiji, Mauritius,[11] United States and in Europe[6][12] (in Tenerife).[13]




Festivals of India

Ganesh Chaturthi (IAST: Gaṇēśa Chaturthī), also known as Vinayaka Chaturthi (Vināyaka Chaturthī) or Vinayaka Chavithi (Vināyaka Chavithī) is a Hindu festival celebrating the birth of Ganesha.[2] A ten-day festival, it starts on the fourth day of Hindu Lunisolar calendar month Bhadrapada, which typically falls in the months of August or September of the Gregorian calendar. The festival is marked with the installation of Ganesha clay idols privately in homes, or publicly on elaborate pandals (temporary stages). Observations include chanting of Vedic hymns and Hindu texts such as Ganapati Upanishad, prayers and vrata (fasting).[2] Offerings and prasadam from the daily prayers, that is distributed from the pandal to the community, include sweets such as modaka believed to be a favorite of the elephant-headed deity.[3][4] The festival ends on the tenth day after start, wherein the idol is carried in a public procession with music and group chanting, then immersed in a nearby body of water such as a river or ocean. In Mumbai alone, around 150,000 statues are immersed annually.[5] thereafter the clay idol dissolves and Ganesha is believed to return to Mount Kailash to Parvati and Shiva.[2][6]

The festival celebrates Lord Ganesha as the God of New Beginnings and the Remover of Obstacles as well as the god of wisdom and intelligence[7][8] and is observed throughout India, especially in the states such as Maharashtra, Madhyapradesh, Karnataka, Goa, Telangana, Gujarat and Chhattisgarh,[2][9] and is usually celebrated privately at home in states such as Tamil Nadu, and Andhra Pradesh.[10] Ganesh Chaturthi is also observed in Nepal and by the Hindu diaspora elsewhere such as in Australia, Canada, Malaysia Trinidad, Suriname, Fiji, Mauritius,[11] United States and in Europe[6][12] (in Tenerife).[13]




Festivals of India

Ganesh Chaturthi (IAST: Gaṇēśa Chaturthī), also known as Vinayaka Chaturthi (Vināyaka Chaturthī) or Vinayaka Chavithi (Vināyaka Chavithī) is a Hindu festival celebrating the birth of Ganesha.[2] A ten-day festival, it starts on the fourth day of Hindu Lunisolar calendar month Bhadrapada, which typically falls in the months of August or September of the Gregorian calendar. The festival is marked with the installation of Ganesha clay idols privately in homes, or publicly on elaborate pandals (temporary stages). Observations include chanting of Vedic hymns and Hindu texts such as Ganapati Upanishad, prayers and vrata (fasting).[2] Offerings and prasadam from the daily prayers, that is distributed from the pandal to the community, include sweets such as modaka believed to be a favorite of the elephant-headed deity.[3][4] The festival ends on the tenth day after start, wherein the idol is carried in a public procession with music and group chanting, then immersed in a nearby body of water such as a river or ocean. In Mumbai alone, around 150,000 statues are immersed annually.[5] thereafter the clay idol dissolves and Ganesha is believed to return to Mount Kailash to Parvati and Shiva.[2][6]

The festival celebrates Lord Ganesha as the God of New Beginnings and the Remover of Obstacles as well as the god of wisdom and intelligence[7][8] and is observed throughout India, especially in the states such as Maharashtra, Madhyapradesh, Karnataka, Goa, Telangana, Gujarat and Chhattisgarh,[2][9] and is usually celebrated privately at home in states such as Tamil Nadu, and Andhra Pradesh.[10] Ganesh Chaturthi is also observed in Nepal and by the Hindu diaspora elsewhere such as in Australia, Canada, Malaysia Trinidad, Suriname, Fiji, Mauritius,[11] United States and in Europe[6][12] (in Tenerife).[13]





Images automaticaly loaded from flickr with tags : (ilemaurice,mauritius)