Togo : Photos

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Intensification des échanges commerciaux entre Lomé et Luanda

republicoftogo.com posted a photo:

Intensification des échanges commerciaux entre Lomé et Luanda




Faire plus ensemble

republicoftogo.com posted a photo:

Faire plus ensemble




Robert Dussey, Antonio Carlos de Salles Menezes et Noel Nelson Messone

Togo, Brésil, Gabon




Baguettes françaises, Tscharé, Togo

©Sekitar --- All rights reserved. Please don't use this image on websites, blogs or other media without my explicit permission.




Pharmacopee Jehovah Rapha, Lomé marché, Togo

©Sekitar --- All rights reserved. Please don't use this image on websites, blogs or other media without my explicit permission.




Danse traditionnelle au couteau près de Lomé, Togo

©Sekitar --- All rights reserved. Please don't use this image on websites, blogs or other media without my explicit permission.




L'église de la paroisse St Joseph d'Agbodrafo, Togo

Ulrich Münstermann posted a photo:

L'église de la paroisse St Joseph d'Agbodrafo, Togo




View onto Lac Togo, Togoville

Ulrich Münstermann posted a photo:

View onto Lac Togo, Togoville




Maison Wood, Lakomé, Agbodrafo, Togo

This house belonged to a Scottish merchant and slave trader, John Henry Wood and was built shortly after 1835, following the installation of Chief Assiakoley in Agbodrafor after being expelled from Aného with a fraction of the Adjigo clan whose chief he was. This house was intended to operate illegally as a slave trading post, despite the abolition of slave trading by England in the Atlantic Treaty in 1807. Accustomed to the practices of slave trading on the shores of Aného, ​​Chief Assiakoley and its notables could indeed not abandon this lucrative trade despite the injunctions of the Western powers and the surveillance of anti-slavery cruises in the Gulf of Benin. This house was used for illegal trafficking until 1852.
Located 3 kilometers from the Atlantic coast, in an area at the time masked by vegetation, the building is of Afro-Brazilian style. It consists of six bedrooms, a living room, corridors 1.5 meters wide and a cellar 1.50 meters high under the entire building. The upper rooms were used as accommodation for the slave traders, while the cellars served as barracks for slaves. The latter were pushed from outside through several vents. A small hatch located in the living room allowed access to the cellars for slave traders.
Unlike those locked up in the forts built along the coast of the Gulf of Guinea as part of the triangular trade, the slaves of Wood's House could not stand in their confinement. The building was designed to allow slave trade but had the characteristics of discretion necessary for this illegal activity.
Near the house, on the way to the ocean, there is a well known as the "well of chained". The slaves washed themselves there before embarking on a slave ship bound for the Americas. The African oral tradition states that after their wash, the slaves were forced to make seven turns of the well in order to cut off their ties with their divinities and to guarantee the slave traders the slaves' abandonment of supernatural forces enabling a mutiny.
Given the locals' fear of the place, the oral tradition has tried to hide the history of the Wood House from the end of the slave trade. It was not until 1999 that a team of African Americans revived the memory of this place during research on sites linked to slavery on the West African coast.
The site has been inscribed on the UNESCO 's Tentative List since 8 January 2002.
The building was restored in 2006.




Monument to Togolese-German friendship (Monument de l'amitié),

Built in 1984 on the occasion of the 100th Anniversary of the signing of the agreement between the King of Togoville and the Germans in 1884. It represents a dove, the national symbol of Togo and two women, representing Togoville and the Germans.

Togoville was originally known as Togo. The country took its name from the town of Togoville when Gustav Nachtigal signed a treaty with the town's chief, Mlapa III, in 1884, from which Germany claimed overlordship over what became Togo.




Notre Dame du Lac, Togoville, Togo

Ulrich Münstermann posted a photo:

Notre Dame du Lac, Togoville, Togo




Maison Wood, Lakomé, Agbodrafo, Togo

This house belonged to a Scottish merchant and slave trader, John Henry Wood and was built shortly after 1835, following the installation of Chief Assiakoley in Agbodrafor after being expelled from Aného with a fraction of the Adjigo clan whose chief he was. This house was intended to operate illegally as a slave trading post, despite the abolition of slave trading by England in the Atlantic Treaty in 1807. Accustomed to the practices of slave trading on the shores of Aného, ​​Chief Assiakoley and its notables could indeed not abandon this lucrative trade despite the injunctions of the Western powers and the surveillance of anti-slavery cruises in the Gulf of Benin. This house was used for illegal trafficking until 1852.
Located 3 kilometers from the Atlantic coast, in an area at the time masked by vegetation, the building is of Afro-Brazilian style. It consists of six bedrooms, a living room, corridors 1.5 meters wide and a cellar 1.50 meters high under the entire building. The upper rooms were used as accommodation for the slave traders, while the cellars served as barracks for slaves. The latter were pushed from outside through several vents. A small hatch located in the living room allowed access to the cellars for slave traders.
Unlike those locked up in the forts built along the coast of the Gulf of Guinea as part of the triangular trade, the slaves of Wood's House could not stand in their confinement. The building was designed to allow slave trade but had the characteristics of discretion necessary for this illegal activity.
Near the house, on the way to the ocean, there is a well known as the "well of chained". The slaves washed themselves there before embarking on a slave ship bound for the Americas. The African oral tradition states that after their wash, the slaves were forced to make seven turns of the well in order to cut off their ties with their divinities and to guarantee the slave traders the slaves' abandonment of supernatural forces enabling a mutiny.
Given the locals' fear of the place, the oral tradition has tried to hide the history of the Wood House from the end of the slave trade. It was not until 1999 that a team of African Americans revived the memory of this place during research on sites linked to slavery on the West African coast.
The site has been inscribed on the UNESCO 's Tentative List since 8 January 2002.
The building was restored in 2006.




The swimming pool, Hotel Pure Plage, Lomé, Togo

Ulrich Münstermann posted a photo:

The swimming pool, Hotel Pure Plage, Lomé, Togo




Monument to Togolese-German friendship (Monument de l'amitié), Togoville, Togo

Built in 1984 on the occasion of the 100th Anniversary of the signing of the agreement between the King of Togoville and the Germans in 1884. It represents a dove, the national symbol of Togo and two women, representing Togoville and the Germans.

Togoville was originally known as Togo. The country took its name from the town of Togoville when Gustav Nachtigal signed a treaty with the town's chief, Mlapa III, in 1884, from which Germany claimed overlordship over what became Togo.




Notre Dame du Lac, Togoville, Togo

Ulrich Münstermann posted a photo:

Notre Dame du Lac, Togoville, Togo




A big tree at a corner of two streets in Togoville, Togo

Ulrich Münstermann posted a photo:

A big tree at a corner of two streets in Togoville, Togo




Notre Dame du Lac, Togoville, Togo

Ulrich Münstermann posted a photo:

Notre Dame du Lac, Togoville, Togo




A local Voodoo Shrine, Togoville, Togo

Ulrich Münstermann posted a photo:

A local Voodoo Shrine, Togoville, Togo




A local Voodoo Shrine, Togoville, Togo

Ulrich Münstermann posted a photo:

A local Voodoo Shrine, Togoville, Togo




Market street in Lomé, Togo

Ulrich Münstermann posted a photo:

Market street in Lomé, Togo





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