Malawi : Photos

Discover every day Photographs of the various countries of Africa and the Caribbean

All the photos are from the photo sharing website flickr

Use the left menu to choose a country.




12781173544

Photo by 39378532@N06




CIAT-Neil Palmer_04

Pic by Neil Palmer (CIAT). Twitter: @NeilCIAT. Trials of drought tolerant beans in Malawi, which is suffering from its worst drought in three decades. Contact n.palmer@cgiar.org




CIAT-Neil Palmer_02

Pic by Neil Palmer (CIAT). Twitter: @NeilCIAT. Trials of drought tolerant beans in Malawi, which is suffering from its worst drought in three decades. The leaf from the drought tolerant variety is yellow, indicating early maturity, enabling the plant to escape the severity of the drought. Contact n.palmer@cgiar.org




CIAT-Neil Palmer_01

Pic by Neil Palmer (CIAT). Twitter: @NeilCIAT. Trials of drought tolerant beans in Malawi, which is suffering from its worst drought in three decades. The pod from the drought tolerant variety is yellow, indicating early maturity, enabling the plant to escape the severity of the drought. Contact n.palmer@cgiar.org




CIAT-Neil Palmer_03

Pic by Neil Palmer (CIAT). Twitter: @NeilCIAT. Trials of CIAT-improved "magic beans" in Malawi, which have performed well despite the the worst drought in three decades. Contact n.palmer@cgiar.org




Piantagioni di the

DG Photographer Diego Giusti posted a photo:

Piantagioni di the




ECHO-funded Namatapa Irrigation Scheme, Malawi

Eluby and her family’s normal routine of subsistence farming was temporarily halted when flooding affected their crops in early January 2015. Due to heavy rains, almost all their crops were washed away, giving them the lowest yield they have ever encountered as a household. Eluby has two sons, Rafiki and Talandira, but she also looks after her sister’s daughter, Emily.

Fortunately, things picked up from them earlier this year when they were found to be eligible for a Save the Children project towards the improved livelihood and resilience of vulnerable households affected by floods in Malawi. The project was funded by the European Commission humanitarian aid department, helping Eluby and her family to bounce back from devastation and to recover economically. They have began yielding mustard seed leaves and selling them at a nearby market.

Luzayo Nyirongo/Save The Children




ECHO-funded Namatapa Irrigation Scheme, Malawi

Eluby and her family’s normal routine of subsistence farming was temporarily halted when flooding affected their crops in early January 2015. Due to heavy rains, almost all their crops were washed away, giving them the lowest yield they have ever encountered as a household. Eluby has two sons, Rafiki and Talandira, but she also looks after her sister’s daughter, Emily.

Fortunately, things picked up from them earlier this year when they were found to be eligible for a Save the Children project towards the improved livelihood and resilience of vulnerable households affected by floods in Malawi. The project was funded by the European Commission humanitarian aid department, helping Eluby and her family to bounce back from devastation and to recover economically. They have began yielding mustard seed leaves and selling them at a nearby market.

Luzayo Nyirongo/Save The Children




ECHO-funded Namatapa Irrigation Scheme, Malawi

Eluby and her family’s normal routine of subsistence farming was temporarily halted when flooding affected their crops in early January 2015. Due to heavy rains, almost all their crops were washed away, giving them the lowest yield they have ever encountered as a household. Eluby has two sons, Rafiki and Talandira, but she also looks after her sister’s daughter, Emily.

Fortunately, things picked up from them earlier this year when they were found to be eligible for a Save the Children project towards the improved livelihood and resilience of vulnerable households affected by floods in Malawi. The project was funded by the European Commission humanitarian aid department, helping Eluby and her family to bounce back from devastation and to recover economically. They have began yielding mustard seed leaves and selling them at a nearby market.

Luzayo Nyirongo/Save The Children




ECHO-funded Namatapa Irrigation Scheme, Malawi

As a means to increase access to food, the European Commission Humanitarian Aid department funded a Save The Children project that distributed assorted vegetable seeds including maize, tomato and mustard seeds to families as well as irrigation equipment.
As a result, Eluby’s family started growing crops in their nursery, in a nearby vegetable garden, and in an allocated space at a small scale irrigation scheme that sits adjacent to their home.
Luzayo Nyirongo/Save The Children




ECHO-funded Namatapa Irrigation Scheme, Malawi

As a means to increase access to food, the European Commission Humanitarian Aid department funded a Save The Children project that distributed assorted vegetable seeds including maize, tomato and mustard seeds to families as well as irrigation equipment.
As a result, Eluby’s family started growing crops in their nursery, in a nearby vegetable garden, and in an allocated space at a small scale irrigation scheme that sits adjacent to their home.
Luzayo Nyirongo/Save The Children




ECHO-funded Namatapa Irrigation Scheme, Malawi

As a means to increase access to food, the European Commission Humanitarian Aid department funded a Save The Children project that distributed assorted vegetable seeds including maize, tomato and mustard seeds to families as well as irrigation equipment.
As a result, Eluby’s family started growing crops in their nursery, in a nearby vegetable garden, and in an allocated space at a small scale irrigation scheme that sits adjacent to their home.
Luzayo Nyirongo/Save The Children




ECHO-funded Namatapa Irrigation Scheme, Malawi

Eluby and her family’s normal routine of subsistence farming was temporarily halted when flooding affected their crops in early January 2015. Due to heavy rains, almost all their crops were washed away, giving them the lowest yield they have ever encountered as a household. Eluby has two sons, Rafiki and Talandira, but she also looks after her sister’s daughter, Emily.

Fortunately, things picked up from them earlier this year when they were found to be eligible for a Save the Children project towards the improved livelihood and resilience of vulnerable households affected by floods in Malawi. The project was funded by the European Commission humanitarian aid department, helping Eluby and her family to bounce back from devastation and to recover economically. They have began yielding mustard seed leaves and selling them at a nearby market.

Luzayo Nyirongo/Save The Children




ECHO-funded Namatapa Irrigation Scheme, Malawi

As a means to increase access to food, the European Commission Humanitarian Aid department funded a Save The Children project that distributed assorted vegetable seeds including maize, tomato and mustard seeds to families as well as irrigation equipment.
As a result, Eluby’s family started growing crops in their nursery, in a nearby vegetable garden, and in an allocated space at a small scale irrigation scheme that sits adjacent to their home.
Luzayo Nyirongo/Save The Children




ECHO-funded Namatapa Irrigation Scheme, Malawi

Eluby and her family’s normal routine of subsistence farming was temporarily halted when flooding affected their crops in early January 2015. Due to heavy rains, almost all their crops were washed away, giving them the lowest yield they have ever encountered as a household. Eluby has two sons, Rafiki and Talandira, but she also looks after her sister’s daughter, Emily.

Fortunately, things picked up from them earlier this year when they were found to be eligible for a Save the Children project towards the improved livelihood and resilience of vulnerable households affected by floods in Malawi. The project was funded by the European Commission humanitarian aid department, helping Eluby and her family to bounce back from devastation and to recover economically. They have began yielding mustard seed leaves and selling them at a nearby market.

Luzayo Nyirongo/Save The Children




ECHO-funded Namatapa Irrigation Scheme, Malawi

As a means to increase access to food, the European Commission Humanitarian Aid department funded a Save The Children project that distributed assorted vegetable seeds including maize, tomato and mustard seeds to families as well as irrigation equipment.
As a result, Eluby’s family started growing crops in their nursery, in a nearby vegetable garden, and in an allocated space at a small scale irrigation scheme that sits adjacent to their home.
Luzayo Nyirongo/Save The Children




ECHO-funded Namatapa Irrigation Scheme, Malawi

As a means to increase access to food, the European Commission Humanitarian Aid department funded a Save The Children project that distributed assorted vegetable seeds including maize, tomato and mustard seeds to families as well as irrigation equipment.
As a result, Eluby’s family started growing crops in their nursery, in a nearby vegetable garden, and in an allocated space at a small scale irrigation scheme that sits adjacent to their home.
Luzayo Nyirongo/Save The Children




ECHO-funded Namatapa Irrigation Scheme, Malawi

As a means to increase access to food, the European Commission Humanitarian Aid department funded a Save The Children project that distributed assorted vegetable seeds including maize, tomato and mustard seeds to families as well as irrigation equipment.
As a result, Eluby’s family started growing crops in their nursery, in a nearby vegetable garden, and in an allocated space at a small scale irrigation scheme that sits adjacent to their home.
Luzayo Nyirongo/Save The Children




ECHO-funded Namatapa Irrigation Scheme, Malawi

Eluby and her family’s normal routine of subsistence farming was temporarily halted when flooding affected their crops in early January 2015. Due to heavy rains, almost all their crops were washed away, giving them the lowest yield they have ever encountered as a household. Eluby has two sons, Rafiki and Talandira, but she also looks after her sister’s daughter, Emily.

Fortunately, things picked up from them earlier this year when they were found to be eligible for a Save the Children project towards the improved livelihood and resilience of vulnerable households affected by floods in Malawi. The project was funded by the European Commission humanitarian aid department, helping Eluby and her family to bounce back from devastation and to recover economically. They have began yielding mustard seed leaves and selling them at a nearby market.

Luzayo Nyirongo/Save The Children




ECHO-funded Namatapa Irrigation Scheme, Malawi

As a means to increase access to food, the European Commission Humanitarian Aid department funded a Save The Children project that distributed assorted vegetable seeds including maize, tomato and mustard seeds to families as well as irrigation equipment.
As a result, Eluby’s family started growing crops in their nursery, in a nearby vegetable garden, and in an allocated space at a small scale irrigation scheme that sits adjacent to their home.
Luzayo Nyirongo/Save The Children





Images automaticaly loaded from flickr with tags : (malawi)